ASM 2023 – Developing a Diverse Workforce

12th July 2023
to 14th July 2023
Eastside Rooms, Birmingham
ASME Annual Scholarship Meeting 2023 - Developing a diverse workforce
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CONFERENCE APP

Download our Conference App
ASM2023 App QR Code from All In The Loop

Download ASM 2023 App using this QR code or alternatively search ASM 2023 on the App store. 

Our App allows you to register for sessions, Provide feedback, Ask questions, View venue map, View information on all exhibitors/sponsors/speakers and lots more! Just input the email address that you used to register for the ASM, then create your account.


e-POSTERS

Click HERE, or scan the QR code below, to view our e-Posters (registered delegates only)

asme.link ePosters23
Just input the email address that you used to register for the ASM, then create an account, to browse the platform and its content.

The e-Poster room allocations list for Thursday 13th July 13:25-14:30 can be found HERE


CONFERENCE BROCHURE

The conference brochure contains detailed information on:

  • Keynote speakers
  • Pre and Intra-conference sessions including symposia and pop-up events
  • Parallel sessions oral presentations timetable for each day

Click on the link below to view our Conference brochureconf brochure

ASME Conference Brochure 2023 Final..

PLEASE NOTE: Our small team have worked very hard to get the papers for the conference prepared, but we are human and there may be some errors, for which we apologise unreservedly.

If you notice an error  please email abstracts@asme.org.uk with the abstracts/session title, type of session (eg oral) and full details of the amendment required by Friday 21st July 2023, and we will make any necessary amendments and reissue the relevant documents the following week on our website. 


conference abstracts 2023ABSTRACTS BOOK

The Abstracts book contains details of all abstracts included in our ASM 2023. Each individual abstract has its own page including information on the day, time, room, authors and presenters. Our abstracts include submissions for e-Posters, oral presentations, relevant awards, and What’s Your Point? sessions.

Click on the link below here to view our Abstracts book
Abstracts ASM 2023

PLEASE NOTE: Our small team have worked very hard to get the papers for the conference prepared, but we are human and there may be some errors, for which we apologise unreservedly.

If you notice an error  please email abstracts@asme.org.uk with the abstracts/session title, type of session (eg oral) and full details of the amendment required by Friday 21st July 2023, and we will make any necessary amendments and reissue the relevant documents the following week on our website. 


parallel sessions cover 2023Click on the links below to view the parallel session timetables

Wednesday 12th July 2023 Parallel Sessions

Thursday 13th July 2023 Parallel Sessions

Friday 14th July 2023 0900-0945 Parallel Sessions

Friday 14th July 2023 1015-1215 Parallel Sessions

PLEASE NOTE: Our small team have worked very hard to get the papers for the conference prepared, but we are human and there may be some errors, for which we apologise unreservedly.

If you notice an error  please email abstracts@asme.org.uk with the abstracts/session title, type of session (eg oral) and full details of the amendment required by Friday 21st July 2023, and we will make any necessary amendments and reissue the relevant documents the following week on our website. 


Registration is open daily :
Wednesday 12th July from 9am
Thursday 13th July from 8am
Friday 14th July from 8.30am

If you have registered to attend more than one day you don’t have to register each morning. All delegates will receive an email on the 6th of July with their barcode to register.

Top tips for presenters 
Don’t forget to bring the email we sent you along with your presentation on a USB stick. After you have registered you can head straight to our speaker preview room (on the 1st floor) where our technicians will upload your presentation. 

Registering for pre/intra conference sessions 
You can sign up for your chosen session via the conference APP. Go to the programme, click on your session and press save session.  Remember all sessions can only be booked on the day that they are taking place and places will be allocated on a first come first served basis! ​

Our Welcome Reception supported by Wiley will take place in the Affinity Suite from 6pm – 7.30pm on Wednesday 12th July. This is open to all delegates who have registered to attend on Wednesday only or for all 3 days.

The JASME / TASME Social will take place at 7.30pm on Wednesday 12th July and is open to any members of JASME / TASME who have registered for our ASM. To register your attendance click HERE

Photography
We will have a professional photographer with us throughout the event, however, there will be a no-photography area marked in the Affinity Suite.

If you would prefer NOT to have your picture taken please speak with a member of the ASME team.

Photo Wall & Social Media
We will have a photo wall in the foyer, where you can get your picture taken with our giant jigsaw pieces.

You can also use the selfie camera on the App to take photos with the ASME logo and upload to our social wall.

You can tweet us @asmeofficial and like us on Facebook @asmeofficial. Remember to share any socials using #asme2023 

Wi-Fi
To connect select The Eastside Rooms and press Connect to the internet.  

Certificates
CPD certificates of attendance and presentation certificates will be sent to the email address that you used to register for the conference within 30 days of the conference close.

Cloakroom
There is a staffed cloakroom in The Eastside Rooms.

Insurance
Delegates and speakers are advised to take out their own travel insurance or to extend their personal policy to cover personal possessions. ASME and the venue do not cover individuals against cancellation of bookings or theft of belongings. It is also recommended that you do not bring any luggage to the venue, unless essential.

Cancellation
We regret that any cancellations or no shows will be charged at the full registration fee.

We’d love to hear your thoughts
Please complete our short survey and to say thank you we will enter you into our prize draw to win a copy of  each of our textbooks; Understanding Medical Education and Researching Medical Education

We’re right here with you
The ASME team will be on site at our ASM so the office will not be staffed from the 10th – 14th July. If you have an urgent query the ASME team can be contacted during office hours on 07857 503630 or come to the main reception desk. 

Wednesday 12th July 2023

0900-1245

Registration

1000-1115

Pre-conference sessions

1115-1200

Plenary Session: Professor Vishna Devi Nadarajah
Gold Medal Winner 2023

Diversity and Inclusion in Health Professions Education: A Lens into the Global South’

1200-1245

Lunch, viewing of posters and exhibits
10 minutes meditation session with ASME’s Mindfulness in Medical Education (MiME) Special Interest Group

1245-1300

Welcome and Opening of the ASM 2023
Professor Sandra Nicholson, ASME Chair

Housekeeping including conference app intro
Professor Gabrielle Finn, Director of Events

1300-1345

Plenary Session: Dr Duncan Shrewsbury
Co-Chair of the Society for Academic Primary Care, and Reader in Clinical Education & Primary Care
Medical Education Research Lead
Deputy Lead for Curriculum Development
Academic GP Training Lead
Brighton & Sussex Medical School

‘Queer as folk: inclusive pedagogies and practices in healthcare’

1345-1415

Refreshment break, viewing of posters and exhibits

1415-1545

Intraconference Sessions/Symposia

1545-1630

Plenary Session: Professor Adam Danquah
Senior Lecturer in Clinical Psychology and Associate Dean for Inclusive Education and Engagement, Faculty of Biology Medicine and Health, University of Manchester

Pigeon Holes and Johari Windows: Rehumanising Ethnicity Categorisation in Healthcare

1630-1730

Oral Presentations including Abstracts, Awards and What’s Your Point presentations

1730-1800

ASME Award Winners Reception

1800-1930

Welcome Reception & Entertainment
(including Presentation of President’s Medal 2023)

Hosted by: Derek Gallen, ASME President
with entertainment from Dame Burley Chassis

 

Thursday 13th July 2023

0800

Registration and arrival refreshments (tea, coffee)

0830-0915

Plenary Session: Professor Sally Curtis
Deputy Head of School Education and Admissions Tutor, University of Southampton

“A Class Apart?” 

0915-1115

Oral Presentations including Abstracts, Awards and What’s Your Point presentations

1115-1145

Refreshment break, viewing of exhibits and posters

1145-1230

Plenary Session: Dr Neera R Jain, PhD, MS, CRC

Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Centre for Health Education Scholarship
University of British Columbia Faculty of Medicine, Canada (2022)

Senior Lecturer
Centre for Medical and Health Sciences Education
Waipapa Taumata Rau/The University of Auckland, Aotearoa/New Zealand (2023)

‘(Un)learning ableism to advance justice in medical education and practice’

1230-1325

Lunch, viewing of posters and exhibits
10 minutes meditation session with ASME’s Mindfulness in Medical Education (MiME) Special Interest Group

 

1325-1430

e-Poster Presentations

1430-1530

Pluto Play Productions: Voices Amplified

1530-1600

Refreshment break, viewing of posters and exhibits

1600-1730

Intraconference Sessions/Symposia

1745-1830

ASME AGM

 

Friday 14th July 2023

0830-0900

Registration and arrival refreshments (tea, coffee)

0900-0945

ASM 2023 Plenary Speaker panel session recorded as podcast

‘Intersecting Identities’

Pop-Ups and What’s Your Point Presentations

0945-1015

Refreshment break, viewing of posters and exhibits

1015-1215

Intraconference Sessions/Symposia

Oral Presentations including Abstracts, Awards and What’s Your Point presentations

1215-1230

Thanks and looking forward to 2024

Close of ASM 2023

Registration Fees

Note for finance departments: If you are organising a group booking please send finance@asme.org.uk a list of the members of the group. 

Please note that the costs below are for Early Bird registrations which are active until 1st June 2023 after which all fees noted here will increase by £50.

 Members 2Non-MembersLWRC 3Early Career 4Undergraduate 5
Whole conference (3 days)£510£600£310£310£200
2 days (Wed/Thurs, Thurs/Fri)£455£545£265£265£180
Wednesday only 1£245£300£175£175£110
Thursday only£285£335£215£215£130
Friday only£230£270£160£160£100
  1. Attendance on Wednesday includes the Welcome Reception.
  2. Staff at institutions that are Institutional members of ASME can register to attend at the members’ rates. Check if your institution is a member here.
  3. LWRC – Less Well Resourced Country rate – for members of ASME living and working in a Less Well Resourced Country (list defined by World Bank)
  4. Early career denotes Junior Doctor/Trainee/Other healthcare professional up to 5 years post-graduation; those on full-time PhD or Masters courses and receiving no salary. Must be an ASME member to benefit from this fee.
  5. Must be a JASME member to benefit from this fee.

Statement from the Chair and Board Regarding ASM 2023 Registration Fees:

We really hope that you are looking forward to attending this year’s ASM and sharing your ideas and work.

The costs of providing such an event and ensuring you have time and space to disseminate your ideas and network with your colleagues have significantly risen.

We are forced to minimise these losses by increasing the cost of registration. We have maintained the student registration prices and increased the early career prices by as little as possible recognising the impact of additional cost on students and those early in their careers, but reluctantly spread across the remaining categories a rise of £50.

We do this alongside accepting a considerable loss on the cost of the conference to support as many members as possible to attend and minimise the impact of a rise as much as possible.

We are passionate about our commitment to accessibility and supporting inclusivity. Our EDI working group will meet at the end of April to discuss support for delegates attending our ASM  from a widening participation background and we will publish an update here in early May. If, in the meantime, you would like to speak with a member of the ASME team about additional support, please email diversityinclusion@asme.org.uk or events@asme.org.uk

Register now

Invite to Exhibit/SponsorSponsors and Exhibitors 2023

ASME are delighted to invite you to exhibit at our Annual Scholarship Meeting, 12th – 14th July 2023, Eastside Rooms, Birmingham, UK

The conference theme is “Developing a diverse workforce”

The conference programme will comprise plenary lectures, workshops, parallel sessions, pop-up events and e-poster presentations. Refreshment and lunch breaks will allow delegates to network with exhibitors. There will be a welcome drinks reception in the evening of the first day attended by the majority of the delegates offering a further opportunity for networking.

Exhibitors and Sponsors have the opportunity to engage with 500+ UK and internationally-based participants.

Download the Sponsorship and Exhibition Opportunities Jan23 booklet

Click here to register as an exhibitor or sponsor

Elsevier

We are delighted to announce that Elsevier are our e-Poster platform sponsors for the ASM 2023

For more than 135 years, Elsevier has specialised in health science content across the entire curriculum, ensuring students, faculty, and institutions have access to reliable and relevant information. As the premier health science information provider, Elsevier attracts the leading authors and editors in their fields. Our content is shaped for diverse teaching and learning purposes, providing students and educators with a wide range of options for achieving successful outcomes.


Keynote SpeakersPluto Play ProductionsASME Journal EditorsDiversity in Healthcare Panel

Neera Jain scaled e1671043040267Dr Neera R. Jain, PhD, MS, CRC

Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Centre for Health Education Scholarship
University of British Columbia Faculty of Medicine, Canada (2022)

Senior Lecturer
Centre for Medical and Health Sciences Education
Waipapa Taumata Rau/The University of Auckland, Aotearoa/New Zealand (2023)

Dr. Jain is a researcher, educator, and committed changemaker focused on critical disability studies, anti-ableism, and qualitative methodologies in medical education, with a wider interest in advancing justice in the field. She co-edited Equal Access for Students with Disabilities: The Guide for Health Science and Professional Education (Springer Publishing, 2020) and co-authored the AAMC special report, Accessibility, Inclusion, and Action in Medical Education: Lived Experiences of Learners and Physicians with Disabilities (2018)Weaving together perspectives of students with disabilities and school officials, Dr. Jain’s award-winning doctoral thesis, Negotiating the capability imperative: Enacting disability inclusion in medical education (2020), explores the limits of an accommodation-focused approach to disability inclusion and imagines a transformational alternative that is inclusive by design.

Dr. Jain began her career in vocational rehabilitation at HealthSouth New England Rehabilitation Hospital and at NYU Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine. She then transitioned to higher education disability inclusion, leading disability services for students in health science education programs at Columbia University in the City of New York and the University of California, San Francisco. In Aotearoa, she managed Auckland Disability Law, a free legal service for disabled people and their whānau.

‘(Un)learning ableism to advance justice in medical education and practice’

Dr Neera R. Jain, PhD

Ableism is increasingly appended to lists of “isms” we must resist in our work, but critical engagement with the concept in our field is nascent. Nonetheless, disability inclusion in medical education is gaining international attention. Disability rights provisions join imperatives to diversity, equity, and inclusion to prompt this advancement. Disabled learners and physicians demonstrate the exciting potential of these efforts. Yet, while the number of learners with disabilities increases and a movement to improve inclusive practices progresses, significant barriers persist in admission, continuation, graduation, and employment. Disabled learners and physicians continue to report startling experiences of mistreatment and express a need to cover their disabilities to advance in medicine. Current efforts have been insufficient to shift conditions. Further engagement with ableism may illuminate why.

Drawing from her research and practice in medical education, disability studies scholarship, and international health professions education literature, Dr. Jain will unveil ableism to illustrate how it operates in medical education spaces. She will argue that we must reckon with ableism and its deeply-entrenched roots in medical education and practice to advance justice in the field.


Duncan Shrewsbury

Dr Duncan Shrewsbury

Co-Chair of the Society for Academic Primary Care, and Reader in Clinical Education & Primary Care

Medical Education Research Lead
Deputy Lead for Curriculum Development
Academic GP Training Lead
Brighton & Sussex Medical School

Dr Duncan Shrewsbury (they/them), is a queer GP in Brighton, UK, and Reader (associate professor) in Clinical Education and Primary Care at Brighton and Sussex Medical School. Duncan is the lead for medical education research and academic GP training, and the deputy lead for curriculum development within the medical school. Alongside Prof. Rupert Payne, Duncan is co-chair of the Society for Academic Primary Care.

‘Queer as folk: inclusive pedagogies and practices in healthcare’

Health inequalities disproportionately affect marginalised communities across the world, and persist despite efforts to address factors contributing to inequity. Communities are often marginalised as a consequence of a particular characteristic, such as: sexuality, gender identity, experience of disability, or ethnicity. LGBTQ+ communities have poorer health outcomes compared to the general population. This is partly due to minority stress and differential healthcare access. Difficulties experienced by LGBTQ+ patients also echo difficulties experienced by LGBTQ+ healthcare professionals.

Regulators of education in healthcare professions rightly promote the development of practitioners who espouse values of inclusivity in the work that they do. Translating these recommendations into pedagogical and clinical practice is a process that remains a challenge for those working in this space. This talk will explore lessons learned from working to address the inequalities faced by LGBTQ+ people in medical education and practice. Drawing on a range of critical perspectives and models, this talk will explore ways of conceptualising, understanding and unpicking factors that frustrate or facilitate inclusive practices in clinical education and care.


Adam Danquah

Professor Adam Danquah

Senior Lecturer in Clinical Psychology and Associate Dean for Inclusive Education and Engagement, Faculty of Biology Medicine and Health, University of Manchester

Adam is Academic Director on the Clinical Psychology Professional Doctorate and the Faculty’s first Associate Dean for Inclusive Education and Engagement. Adam’s work focuses on helping university staff and healthcare practitioners to deal with the emotional and relational challenges of the work, to improve student outcomes and professional practice. This approach is exemplified in his Higher Education Anti-Racism Training (HEART), which asks higher education professionals to commit to a transformative programme of group-work and action. In line with his creative approach to pedagogy, Adam was shortlisted for the Times Higher Education Awards ‘Most Innovative Teacher of the Year 2022’. Adam’s leadership in teaching and learning, outstanding contribution to student outcomes and the teaching profession in HE has been recognised with a National Teaching Fellowship and Principal Fellowship of AdvanceHE.

‘Pigeon Holes and Johari Windows: Rehumanising Ethnicity Categorisation in Healthcare’

Categorisation is just what we do in healthcare. It allows for definitions to be shared, so that conditions can be targeted and treatments, standardised. It allows for concepts and constructs to become testable objects of research. And, with the increasing push for diversity and inclusion, it allows for disparities to be identified, to evidence progress and enable accountability.

But could these distinctions be doing as much harm as good? In the field of inclusive education much of my work is focused on awarding gaps and differential attainment – which show differences in the proportions of ‘good’ degrees (and other indices of educational attainment and progress) awarded to some groups of students and trainees compared to others. As much as I am dependent on group categorisations to see this unfairness, I am aware of the way in which negative, reductive associations could be being reinforced in my mind – and thereby practice.

Using ethnic categorisation in particular, I am going to look at this unwelcome impact in more detail – and what we can do about it.


Sally Curtis

Professor Sally Curtis

Deputy Head of School Education and Admissions Tutor

University of Southampton

Sally is Deputy Head of School Education and Admissions Tutor at the University of Southampton where she and works with students and staff in the Faculty of Medicine to deliver excellent student experience, with a focus on equity, belonging and social accountability. Sally has held a variety of teaching and coordinating roles across all undergraduate programmes, with her main contribution in the Widening Participation (WP) to medicine BM6 programme. Since its inception in 2002, Sally has both taught and developed the curriculum and was the BM6 programme lead from 2012-2020. Sally received the National Teaching Fellow award in 2019 in recognition or her work in widening participation and student support. She also leads a Medical Education research group that includes external collaborations, PhD students, MMedSc students and BMedSc students, and focuses on WP and the student experience. As a member of the Medical Schools Council Selection Alliance (MSCSA) and elected member of the MSCSA executive board since 2014, Sally has been involved in successful change management initiatives, developing national policy relating to selection and widening participation. Sally co-wrote the current indicators of best practice in the use of contextual admissions and leads the national data monitoring group for MSCSA board.

“A Class Apart?”

Sally will be drawing on over 20 years’ experience of teaching widening participation students and what she has learnt from them about the challenges and barriers they face studying for one of the most elite professions. She will explore the richness these students bring to the medical school and university as well as to the profession, including how they highlight the need for change in both educational and professional environments. Using the students’ own words, she will walk you through their experiences from entering medical school, through key transition points to graduation and entering the profession. She will cover topics such as undertaking paid employment, competing interests and responsibilities, drivers for choice, sense of belonging and views on what constitutes success Using findings from research undertaken by her students and wider research group, she will consider the impact of the student deficit discourse, often associated with students from widening participation backgrounds, and the need for institutional responsibility in changing this.


Vishna cropped

Professor Vishna Devi V Nadarajah 

Prof Vishna Devi V Nadarajah is currently the Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Institutional Development and International and Professor of Human Biology at the International Medical University. Prior to this appointment, she held the positions of Pro Vice-Chancellor, Institutional Development and International (2020-2022), Pro Vice-Chancellor, Education (2018-2019) and Dean of Learning and Teaching (2014-2017). She graduated with a First-Class Honours degree in Biochemistry from the University of Malaya (1994) and obtained her PhD at the University of Cambridge in the field of microbial biochemistry (2000). She also received her Masters in Health Professions Education from Maastricht University (2014). Her leadership portfolio at IMU includes the strategic development of academic programmes, growth and diversification of international partnerships, enhancement educational activities via technology enhancing learning, talent and continuous professional development.

Prof Vishna is actively involved and globally recognized for her advocacy for medical and health professions education. She is passionate about faculty and professional staff development, and prioritizes inclusion especially for the advancement of scholarship.  She has published and presented research papers in both biomedical sciences and medical education; and supervises research students and reviews for indexed and international journals. She is currently a Board member of the AMEE (An International Association for Health Professions Education) ASPIRE Awards of Excellence, the Deputy Editor of the pre-eminent journal Medical Education , Core leadership and founding member of Mentors Across Borders and Advisory Board Member of several other international HPE journals and organisations. She was awarded the Malaysian Women’s Weekly (2012), Great Women of Our Time award for her contribution in Science and Technology in Malaysia and in 2018, was awarded the National Outstanding Educator Award (university category), awarded by Private Education Cooperation Malaysia. She was recently nominated and appointed as Visiting Professor at the University of Surrey, United Kingdom, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences.

 Her areas of research in health professions education is in Faculty Development, Assessment and Innovative Teaching-Learning methods. Prof Vishna has shared her experience and expertise in health professions’ education via invitations to speak at conferences, conducting faculty development workshops, guest faculty and collaborative research, appreciating that she has also learnt much from these collaborative sessions with other educators.

‘Diversity and Inclusion in Health Professions Education: A Lens into the Global South’

For health professions educators and leaders of institutions, diversity and inclusion (DI) initiatives are increasingly recognized as important for graduate work readiness, institutional growth and sustainability. While acknowledging that there will be valuable lessons to be learnt from the differences and similarities in DI implementation from institutions around the globe, the opportunity to learn from others experiences maybe limited for the Global North.  One possible reason is the scholarship and discourses around these topics are tilted to the Global North. This presentation will provide a view of diversity and inclusion initiatives in Health Professions Education from a region in the Global South and address areas of similarities and differences for consideration. Strengths, challenges, and opportunities for improvement will be presented in consideration of socio-political changes, digital transformation and the changing landscape in healthcare.

PPP logo

We are delighted to have PlutoPlay Productions participating in our ASM 2023.

Pluto Play Productions was founded by Brian Daniels and the late Andrew Connolly in 1997, and Brian is the current CEO. It is a registered charity and was created to take over the running and management of the famous New End Theatre in Hampstead, North London.

Pluto Play Productions is governed by a Board of Trustees with the CEO reporting to the Board members through the year about work and financial matters. Its stated aim is:

“the advancement of public education in all aspects of the dramatic arts by the presentation and production of plays and other expressions of drama, including the commissioning of new works and the mounting of public performances of them”.

Since 2011, more than 20 commissioned plays have been added to the Pluto Play Productions portfolio, all written by Brian Daniels, that address contemporary issues around health and social care, life limiting illness and bereavement, dementia, and family relationships. An ensemble of professional directors and actors bring the stories to life, and most are staged radio-style where the actors sit facing the audience and read script in-hand.

Each performance is followed by a discussion involving the audience, usually with an expert panel, that has become an integral part of the whole experience. The atmosphere created by a performance provides a unique forum for promoting critical thinking and the exchange of ideas, for shining a light on difficult issues and encouragement to initiate change, both individually and collectively.

Pluto Play Productions will be presenting two productions at our Annual Scholarship Meeting.

“Voices Amplified” will be a plenary session to which all conference attendees are welcome to attend. This will be held on the afternoon of Thursday 13th July 2023.

“Voices Amplified” by Brian Daniels is directed by Marie Fortune and performed script-in-hand by 7 actors.  The play examines and raises awareness of micro-aggression and covert discrimination within a healthcare setting.  We may not be aware that we are being discriminatory in any way, it may never have occurred to us, but may sometimes be careless with our language and expressions.  Communication is key to successful healthcare treatment.  Those engaged in healthcare come from a range of ethnic backgrounds – as do our patients.  The play draws you into the world of a fictitious hospital department, giving insights into aspects of positive – and not so positive – behaviour. The running time of the play is approximately 40 minutes.

 Pluto Play Productions are also sharing with us their “Hello my name is …” production which will be offered as an intraconference session.

‘Hello my name is…’, a play inspired by the life and work of the late Dr Kate Granger, explores the dynamic realities of human interaction in health and social care. Dr Granger’s insistence that individuals whose business it is to deliver health care should always introduce themselves to their patients by saying, “hello, my name is…” It was a powerful call for dignity and identity in healthcare, born of her own experiences as a cancer sufferer and patient.

Amidst the shock and heartbreak of her own experience, Kate’s outlook was transformed when a hospital porter introduced himself with simple sensitivity: “Hello, my name is Brian…” Kate felt her self-worth rising and a campaign that would find global acceptance was born.

Commissioned by St Gemma’s Hospice in Leeds, where Kate died on their 11th Wedding Anniversary, ‘Hello My Name Is…” takes a close look at the lives of Kate and her husband Chris. Through the use of humour and pathos, they made a compelling case for a simple but transformative approach to the delivery of essential health care services.

The Editors of the ASME Journals – Medical Education and The Clinical Teacher – will be with us for our ASM in Birmingham. Details of  their sessions will be shared here soon. 

Dr. Kevin Eva

Kevin Eva

Associate Director and Senior Scientist in the Centre for Health Education Scholarship, and Professor and Director of Educational Research and Scholarship in the Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia (Canada).

Editor-in-Chief of the Journal Medical Education

Dr. Kevin Eva is Associate Director and Senior Scientist in the Centre for Health Education Scholarship, and Professor and Director of Educational Research and Scholarship in the Department of Medicine, at the University of British Columbia.  He completed his PhD in Cognitive Psychology (McMaster University) in 2001 and became Editor-in-Chief for the journal Medical Education in 2008. 

Dr. Eva maintains a number of international appointments including Honorary Skou Professor at Aarhus University (Denmark), Honorary Professorial Fellow at the University of Melbourne (Australia), and visiting professor at the University of Bern (Switzerland).  He has consulted broadly around the globe including advisory roles for the National Board of Medical Examiners (US) and National Health Services Education (Scotland).  He co-founded the Maastricht-Canada Masters of Health Professional Education program and works extensively with the Medical Council of Canada and the College of Physicians and Surgeons of British Columbia.

Dr. Eva’s current research interests are broadly defined within the context of research into educational practices within the health professions. They include research into (1) The value and limits of subjectivity as a means of assessing performance, (2) The promotion and assessment of non-academic characteristics in professional practice, (3) The context specific nature of performance, (4) The conceptualization, nature, and use of self-assessment, (5) The psychological processes that impact upon one’s responsiveness to feedback, and (6) The nature of clinical expertise.  

Awards for this work include the Karolinska Institutet Prize for Research in Medical Education, an Honorary Fellowship from the Academy of Medical Educators (UK), MILES Award for Mentoring, Innovation, and Leadership in Education Scholarship (Singapore), the President’s Award for Exemplary National Leadership from the Association of Faculties of Medicine in Canada, the Outstanding Achievement Award from the Medical Council of Canada, the Ian Hart Award for Distinguished Contribution to Medical Education (Canada), and the John P. Hubbard award from the National Board of Medical Examiners (USA).


Aileen Barrett

Dr Aileen Barrett

Originally a physiotherapist, Dr Aileen Barrett completed her PhD in medical education at University College Cork and has a special interest in feedback, workplace-based assessment, faculty development and clinical teaching in health professions. As an education specialist at the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland, she was responsible for the development and review of postgraduate training programme curricula and the design of continuing education programmes and workshops. In 2019 Aileen led the development of Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) for GP training in Ireland and the design of workplace-based assessment tools to support GP trainee learning. As a member of EXQUISITE, the European Center of Excellence in Qualitative Inquiry and Study in Training and Education (for health), Aileen has published a number of papers on qualitative research methods and is a research supervisor on the Masters of Health Sciences (Clinical Education) at NUI Galway. She was appointed as Editor-in-Chief of The Clinical Teacher in December 2020.


Professor Karen Mattickprofessor karen mattick ASME photo

Deputy Editor, Medical Education

Karen is Professor of Medical Education at the University of Exeter and Deputy Editor for the journal Medical Education.  Her previous roles have included Senior Associate Editor at The Clinical Teacher and Director of Awards for ASME.  She has published over 100 research articles, first in biomedical science as a Clinical Scientist (public health microbiology/epidemiology) and subsequently in health professions education.  Her current research focusses on the work and wellbeing of health professionals, especially during early clinical practice, typically using close-to-practice research methodologies informed by sociocultural theories.


Kevin and Aileen will be running the following session along with Vishna Nadarajah

ASME Journals The Clinical Teacher and Medical Education

Expanding Borders and Challenging Minds: Successful Peer Reviewing

Leads: Dr Aileen Barrett, Dr Vishna Nadarajah and Dr Kevin Eva

Becoming a peer reviewer is simultaneously an act of altruism and of self-interest. Altruistically, it provides an opportunity to contribute to the advancement of knowledge and rigour in health professional education while shaping the direction of the field and supporting colleagues in the development of their scholarly efforts. At the same time, peer reviewing allows reviewers to stay up-to-date with the latest research, expanding their own knowledge, while also enhancing their writing, critical thinking and consultation skills. Peer review is also critical in ensuring that a piece of work is viewed through diverse lenses.

This workshop will be aimed at equipping participants with the skills and knowledge necessary to become effective peer reviewers. Through interactive activities and discussions, participants will learn about the peer review process, different forms of peer review, and best practices. They will also gain practical experience in critiquing and providing constructive feedback by evaluating conference abstracts.

Workshop participants will be asked to consider the following questions and issues:

(1) How does one get started as a peer reviewer?

(2) What supports are available?

(3) What ethical considerations should I keep in mind?

(4) How can peer review help equity, diversity, and inclusion efforts?

(5) Can I become a peer reviewer if I haven’t published? The role of mentored peer reviews

By the end of the workshop, participants will have a better understanding of how to critically evaluate academic writing and be able to contribute to the advancement of health professional education through thoughtful and insightful peer review.


ASME Journals The Clinical Teacher and Medical Education

Writing for publication

Leads: Dr Aileen Barrett and Professor Karen Mattick

Writing for publication in health professions education is an important skill, essential in developing an evidence base of practice, for broad dissemination of findings and raising the quality of healthcare education. Submission to peer-review is a defining component of scholarly practice and proof of writing success is often a requirement for promotion when applying for funding and providing evidence of professional impact. However, for both novice and experts alike, writing for publication can be a challenging experience as competition for publication is fierce and the standards in the field continue to rise.

In this workshop journal editors share their knowledge of the field of publishing and tricks of the trade for maximizing the likelihood of publication success. They will aim to provide a glimpse of what goes on ‘behind the scenes’ of the publication process in an effort to unravel some of the mysteries of peer review and increase understanding of what it takes to publish in health professional education journals specifically, relative to the broader scientific literature.

Workshop participants will be asked to consider the following questions and issues:

(1) What problems are commonly encountered?

(2) What makes a good paper? Why do papers get accepted or rejected?

(3) What happens to a paper during the review process?

(4) Ethical aspects of publication.

Through this they will gain knowledge regarding what health professional education research journal Editors are looking for, how to maximize the chance of publication success, and strategies for writing clearly.

Content to follow

Wednesday 1000-1115hrsWednesday 1415-1545hrsThursday 1600-1730hrsFriday 1015-1215hrs

TASME Logo RGBAn introduction for early career medical educators

Wednesday 12th July, 1000-1115hrs, MR5

Session Lead: Sean Zhou, Trainee Association for the Study of Medical Education (TASME), @_SeanZhou

Additional Presenter: Cleone Pardoe

This is a fantastic workshop and introduction to the conference for new and seasoned attendees alike. Meet like minded individuals and get to know fellow educators and researchers at your stage. We will also have more senior members in attendance to help guide you through the content at the conference and help unravel some of the complexities around a career within medical education.

Educational Methods:

This session has had several iterations over the years and has become a staple during the ASME ASM. It is always an interactive session with small group exercises to help stimulate your ideas and creativity within medical education. There will also be ways to highlight and share your research and education experiences with input from senior medical education personnel.

Objectives & Outcomes:

  1. An introduction to the ASME ASM, including content targeted at early career educators
  2. How to start your medical education journey, or take it to the next level
  3. Networking opportunities for near-peers and senior mentors

Integrating sustainable healthcare into the health professions curricula

Wednesday 12th July, 1000-1115hrs, MR7

Session Lead: Renee Ewe, Imperial College London, @ReneeEwe

Additional Presenters: Sophie Mascarenhas, Jaspreet Sangha

Is teaching and learning about sustainable healthcare embedded in your curriculum? Are you confident about what to teach, and how to teach this? If the answer is no, you are not alone. Despite climate change being widely recognised as a health emergency that is impacting healthcare systems globally, healthcare is a huge carbon emitter. If it were a country, it would be the fifth largest carbon emitter [1]. Our future healthcare professionals will need the skills to reduce the environmental impact of healthcare while managing the health consequences of climate change. The General Medical Council and Nursing and Midwifery Council have emphasised the importance of teaching sustainable healthcare principles to students [2,3]. Medical students globally have also called upon medical educators to integrate this into their core teaching [4]. Despite this, sustainable healthcare is still not widely incorporated into health professions curricula.

In this interactive workshop, we will explore the collective challenges we face with integrating sustainability within healthcare curricula and the successes we have had so far. We will also discuss key sustainable healthcare principles to guide new teaching innovations. We will collaboratively develop ideas for teaching activities that participants can implement in their own teaching practices.

References:

  1. Karliner, J., et al., Health care’s climate footprint: the health sector contribution and opportunities for action. European Journal of Public Health, 2020. 30(Supplement_5): p. ckaa165. 843.

  2. General Medical Council, Outcomes for graduates. London: General Medical Council, 2018. 28.

  3. Nursing and Midwifery Council, Standards of proficiencies for midwives. London: Nursing and Midwifery Council, 2019.

  4. Hampshire, K., et al., The Planetary Health Report Card: a student-led initiative to inspire planetary health in medical schools. The Lancet Planetary Health, 2022.

Educational Methods: This session will be underpinned by social constructivist principles [1], with participants encouraged to exchange knowledge with each other and co-create new solutions to scenarios posed by the facilitators. The facilitators comprise of two undergraduate medical students and a GP medical educator.

Mentimeter will be used to understand participants’ experience and confidence with sustainable healthcare education. Participants will work in their table groups to discuss any challenges they or barriers they have faced when teaching sustainable healthcare education. Each group will then feed this back to the larger group to promote discussion and develop a joint understanding of the collective challenges faced. 

We will discuss the key principles of sustainable healthcare [2] and invite participants to share their perspectives on these principles and how they may relate to their area of practice. 

The facilitators will present examples of sustainable healthcare being weaved into existing teaching sessions. Participants will then work within their table groups to co-create ideas for sustainable healthcare teaching activities within their own area of practice based. Facilitators will prompt each group to consider how they may be able to do this within central teaching or whilst delivering teaching on clinical placements. Facilitators will provide copies of important frameworks and case studies as a starting point for participants’ discussions. Facilitators will circulate around the room to support these discussions. Participants will be encouraged to develop their ideas on flipchart paper and to choose one actionable step to feed back to the wider group. 

The facilitators will summarise the session and key take home points. We will encourage participants to build on their discussions in this session by signposting them to sustainable healthcare education social networks and courses by the Centre for Sustainable Healthcare.

References:

  1. Wadsworth, B.J., Piaget’s theory of cognitive and affective development: Foundations of constructivism. Longman Publishing., Vancouver, 1996.
  2. Mortimer F. The sustainable physician. Clinical Medicine. 2010 Apr;10(2):110.

Objectives & Outcomes:

Objectives:

– Knowledge:

*Discuss the key principles of sustainable healthcare

*Identify current guidance on sustainability within health professions curricula 

-Attitudes:

*Understand the importance of sustainable healthcare education within undergraduate health professions’ education 

*Openly discuss the barriers educators have faced when integrating sustainability within their teaching

-Skills

*Co-create practical opportunities to teach healthcare professions students sustainable healthcare principles 

Outcomes:

Following this workshop, participants will be able to:

-Knowledge:

*apply their knowledge of key principles of sustainable healthcare

-Attitudes:

*appreciate the importance of integrating sustainable healthcare within undergraduate health professions education

*feel empowered to implement sustainable healthcare teaching in their own discipline

-Skills:

*create sustainable healthcare learning opportunities within their own scope of practice


Moving from policy to practice to tackle microaggressions

Wednesday 12th July, 1000-1115hrs, MR10

Session Lead: Joanne Harris, University of Buckingham, @jovicharris1

Additional Presenters: Joanne Selway, Jacqueline O’Dowd

The creation of an inclusive work environment that is safe and supportive for all, is key to achieving a diverse workforce. While equality legislation and local polices set out a commitment to address inequalities and remove discrimination, these policies often fail to address the behaviours that lead to covert bias in a workplace. This is often due to effects of the hidden curriculum and competing discourses present in medicine.

It is important to differentiate between microaggressions and incidences of overt discrimination. Microaggressions are every day, subtle, intentional, or unintentional interactions or behaviours that communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative messages toward a marginalised individual or group. Many people are trying to be complimentary when delivering microaggressions, highlighting the need for an enhanced understanding and culture change in the workplace.

The first step in addressing microaggressions is to provide individuals with the skills to recognize when a microaggression has occurred and address these behaviours. In many cases, this will involve education and an enhanced awareness of unconscious biases. In this workshop, participants will discuss types of microaggression and share good practice of how to address the underlying culture of tolerance of microaggressions. The workshop will additionally draw on learning from empirical data gathered from students at two UK medical schools and explore the coping mechanisms they are using to deal with microaggressions.

Much of the learning comes from the participants themselves, through thought-provoking activities and cross-table conversations. including their own questions, experiences, or challenges. Participants will brainstorm practical strategies and actions to raise awareness of microaggressions, making it harder for covert discrimination to exist surreptitiously within a working or learning environment.

Educational Methods:

  • Polling via mobile polling app
  • Brainstorm
  • Think Group Share – postcard reflections
  • Buzz group session
  • Discussion of case studies
  • Final thoughts via mobile phone app to develop word cloud

Objectives & Outcomes:

Knowledge

  • Understand what we mean by the term microaggression and differentiate from incidences of overt discrimination (e.g., sexism, racism, classism and homophobia)
  • Recognise when it is appropriate to raise and escalate concerns through informal communication with colleagues and through formal clinical governance and monitoring systems about undermining.
  • Understand how effective interpersonal relationships can build an inclusive environment
  • Develop an understanding of messages delivered by different discourses in medicine

Attitudes

  • Recognise the potential impact of participants own attitudes, values, beliefs, perceptions and personal biases (which may be unconscious) on individuals and groups
  • Develop a commitment to equality, diversity, and inclusion.

Skills

  • Identify microaggressions and differentiate from overt discrimination
  • Highlight the effects of microaggressions on marginalised groups
  • Identify personal strategies to address microaggressions
  • Act appropriately, with an inclusive approach, towards individuals and groups
  • Develop an ability to challenge accepted wisdoms
  • Apply critical reflexivity to one’s own actions and those of others

Perspectives on Professionalism: A collaborative exploration of what professionalism is and means in a contemporary and diverse healthcare settings

Wednesday 12th July, 1000-1115hrs, Tactic MR

Session Lead: Dr Joseph Hartland, Bristol Medical School, @hartlandjoseph

Additional Presenters: Dr Duncan Shrewsbury, Dr Viktoria Goddard

The concept of professionalism dominates healthcare education and the lives of healthcare students and practitioners across the world; yet there remains no single universally agreed definition nor framework (Goddard and Brockbank 2022). The challenges caused by this lack of consensus are reflected in debates about what constitutes “unprofessional behaviour”, taking place between healthcare professionals across social media and increasingly in academic output that recognises that current definitions of professionalism are both outdated and arguably no-longer fit for purpose. Many such conversations surround the dichotomy that exists when socially marginalised students and staff have their identities perceived as being in conflict with traditional models of professionalism.

The workshop discussion will explore a number of themes linked to debates on professionalism, its codification and the nurturing of it in medical students – including application of dress codes, social media use and more broadly notions of “expected behaviours”. Participants will be invited to discuss challenges experienced within their own contexts of both teaching about, and applying the definitions of, professionalism to their students

This workshop is part of a collaborative UK action-learning scholarship project, aiming to shape new academic discourse and explore in-depth perspectives on professionalism with participants. We propose to identify moments of consensus while discussing perspectives on professionalism from different contexts, by repeating the workshop across various national and international meetings.

Participants are asked to consider the following questions before the workshop:

  • What challenges does the term “professionalism” pose for different student and staff groups in your context, and why?
  • How do you use the guidance on professionalism available to you? (This might be from your national regulator, from local healthcare settings or even locally produced guidance within your own School)
  • How might a consensus on professionalism that is inclusive/welcoming of the diversity of the workforce be reached?

Educational Methods:

Participants should come to the workshop prepared to share their own experiences of working with the concept of professionalism in both education and healthcare settings.

The workshop will begin with a short presentation by the facilitators, framing the current literature debating inconsistent and problematic definitions of professionalism. Participants will then use their prepared reflections to partake in discussions framed around a World Café format, with facilitators encouraging respectful and fluid participant-led debates. The intention is to stimulate social learning and reflection, with multiple modalities available for participants to record their thinking. Consent will be taken to use the both IT (padlet style discussion boards) and low tech records (table cloth notations) to inform research for the action-learning scholarship project and feedback to participants who attend to supplement their post-workshop reflections.

Objectives & Outcomes:

Participants will:

  • Develop knowledge of the current debates about how professionalism is defined in healthcare.
  • Begin to critically reflect and interrogate the dominant definitions of professionalism that they work with
  • Consider the challenges these pose within their own teaching and working contexts

Presentation skills for new presenters (An ASME EDC Workshop) EDC Logo RGB

Wednesday 12th July, 1000-1115hrs, MR8

Session Lead: Dr Catherine Bennett, University of Warwick and ASME EDC Chair; University of Leicester and EDC, @DrCathBenn

Presenting to a large audience at a national conference can be challenging, particularly for first timers!

Effective oral communication is a crucial skill for all health professionals, particularly educators and those interested in research who need to explain their work to others. When developing and rehearing a presentation, it’s easy to concentrate on the content and message of the presentation and overlook the personal style and communications skills of the presenter.

Very few people naturally possess outstanding presentation skills from the outset. Most presenters are anxious about their presentation skills and about handling any questions posed by the “expert” audience. However, practice and receiving specific feedback can improve performance.

This workshop is aimed at those presenting this year at the ASME ASM who would like the opportunity to rehearse and at all those who would like the opportunity to contribute to the discussion of effective presentation skills. A small number of volunteers will run through their presentations “in real time” and receive feedback from the panel – members of ASME’s Educator Development Committee (EDC) – and from the audience in true constructive educational style!

We are here to help and support you so that you can develop additional confidence in the delivery of your work prior to the “real thing”.

If you would like to request a presentation slot, please email the Educator Development Committee (EDC) Chair (edc@asme.org.uk) prior to the ASM with a copy of your abstract, indicating whether you are a first-time presenter.

Educational Methods:

Potential participants are invited to email the Educator Development Committee (EDC) Chair (edc@asme.org.uk) prior to the ASM with their abstract to request a presentation slot, indicating whether they are a first-time presenter.

Each selected volunteer presenter will be allocated a total of 20 minutes for presentation and feedback from the panel and from peers.

It will not be possible for all who attend this workshop to be allocated a personal presentation slot (priority will be given to first time ASME presenters) but everyone will be able to learn from those presenting, listen to and contribute to feedback and participate in the interactive group discussion.

Objectives & Outcomes:

Objectives: Allow new presenters the opportunity to receive feedback on their presentation skills before their ASM presentation slot, and enable all participants to consider what makes an effective conference presentation and contribute to the feedback discussion.

Outcomes:

  1. Consider what makes an effective conference presentation.
  2. Presenters will receive specific feedback and encouragement to enhance the “real” presentation.
  3. Learn how voice, physical presence and behaviour during presentation are received by the audience.
  4. Improve confidence with audience interaction.

Sexual violence and educating clinicians: An evaluation of workshops for medical students. What next?

Wednesday 12th July, 1000-1115hrs, MR2

Session Lead: Dr Sabena Jameel, University of Birmingham, @sabenaj

Additional Presenters: Dr Sophie King-Hill, Miss Darya Ibrahim

The burden of sexual discrimination, harassment and violence in society and in medicine is vast [1]. These incidents are gender-based, common and often under-reported. The ramifications affect patients, healthcare staff, bystanders and students indiscriminately. Studies have revealed that doctors personally experience, witness and were accused of sexual abuse, harassment and misconduct [2]. Half did not report the behaviour. Junior doctors were more likely to be affected.

Awareness about the unacceptability of this behaviour is increasing but many feel poorly equipped to recognise, react and report such incidents. Every third year MBChB Medical Student at our medical school was required to attend a workshop on sexual violence. The educators came from a multi-disciplinary group of academics from across the University. The goal was to have candid conversations that were embedded within professional and university regulations and explore how students navigate particular case studies. These were designed to get learners to think about the victim, bystander, care-giver, potential perpetrator and, crucially, their positionality in relation to reporting. During the workshops pre and post preparedness data was collated. The intention was to derive recommendations to develop this work.

This session will outline the current culture in relation to misogyny, VAWG, harassment and reporting in medicine. Linking this to students experience and throughout their career. What is needed for culture shift will be explored and the barrier to this will be examined. The learning from undertaking these workshops will be outlined. Clear themes arose from these workshops [3]. The session aims to get delegates to share their own experiences in their educational institutions with a view to sharing good ideas and lessons learnt. Delegates will leave with a better idea of how they might translate these workshops into their own contexts and issues surrounding combatting this very real and damaging issue.

Educational Methods:

Educational Methods  – Constructivist approach (Context-Collaboration), small group discussions extended to wider group for themes. Engendering a safe space for open and frank discussion.

Interactive learning methods – Case study based Slido polling, small group work – creative note taking, feedback to larger group 2 minute task as a group. Q&A time.

Objectives & Outcomes:

During the course of the session the facilitators will outline the scale of the problem, and in particular, in the context of medical education.

During the course of the session the collective insight of the group in relation to knowledge about sexual violence, harassment and discrimination in medical education will be anonymously polled. This will identify particular areas of learning need and faculty development.

The session will describe a workshop, designed by a multi-disciplinary team that was presented to all Y3 Medical Students at a large UK Medical School. Delegates will be given opportunity to reflect on the session, describing what they think was done well and what they might do differently.

Data will be presented to the delegates about the preparedness and post workshop impact from the medical students. The data will be critically reflected upon as a group.

To conclude, the session will end by asking delegates how they might design their own sexual violence workshop in their own teaching contexts. Discussion what resources and support they would need to operationalise this.

For most delegates the session will increase their knowledge in understanding the nature, prevalence and challenges in tackling sexual violence, discrimination and harassment. Delegates will learn from the experiences of the facilitators and contextualise the lessons. An attitude of proactive intervention in addressing sexism and misogyny will be promoted. This workshop hopes to equip delegates with skills and practical tools to have the courage to tackle this in their own milieu.


Support initiatives for  medical students and trainees with ADHD and Autism

Wednesday 12th July, 1000-1115hrs, MR11

Session Lead: Professor Pamela Hagan, University Of Nottingham, @P44Pam

Additional Presenter: Beth Hill

Background: Work has been done recently to understand the challenges and barriers of neurodivergence while studying and training in medicine. A substantial proportion of our medical student and trainee population have diagnosed or undiagnosed Autism, ADHD, or other form of neurodiversity. The challenges faced at medical school, in training and in practice are poorly understood (Bury et al 2021). Evidence on how to support neurodiverse doctors is also limited (Robinson D 2022).

Last year our  initial workshop on this topic explored some of the issues and lived experiences and provided a forum for learning and discussion.

This second interactive workshop will move the agenda forward by creating a space to share what the community have developed, share what practical initiatives have been developed and explore faculty training materials and resources.

The workshop will enable participants to learn about what is happening currently, what adjustments are being supported and to gain support in implementing other successful initiatives. All information will be captured and will contribute to a resource toolkit to be shared via MEDISS ASME and the wider education community.

Reference(s)

Workplace social challenges experienced by employees on the autistic spectrum: an international exploratory study, examining employee & supervisor perspective. Bury S.M, Flower R.L, Zulla R. (2021) J of Autism Dev Disorders 51, 5 1614-1627

Neurodiversity in medical education: How can we improve postgraduate learning for neurodiverse doctors?  Robinson D.  (2022) Med Teacher 44(5):564-566

Educational Methods:

This is an experiential interactive workshop with the expectation of participation.

There will also be the opportunity to explore and take part in some Facutly development training that has been created.

Participants will be in groups for specific tasks and feedback activities.

Time will be allowed for debate and networking.

Round tables and chairs for group discussion and activities

Objectives

To build on the learning gained from a previous workshop (ASME 2022) to increase the understanding of challenges faced by our medical students and trainees with autism/ASD.

To showcase and share initiatives developed and adjustments made.

To add to resources for the development of a toolkit for dissemination to the wider medical education community via MEDISS

The GMC Welcome and Valued framework and the Equality Act 2010

ERC - Education Research CommitteeBreaking down barriers and strengthening impact: Embedding equality, diversity and inclusivity within Health Professions Education research

Wednesday 12th July, 1415-1545hrs, MR8

Session Lead: Dr Amaya Ellawala, Education Research Committee, @ERC_ASME

Additional Presenters: Dr Stephanie Bull, Nabilah Mayat

When we think about the research that we conduct – does it include a diverse range of voices? Does it accurately reflect the intricacies of our study contexts?

Through our research processes, we may inadvertently fail to acknowledge contextual and systemic barriers that limit participation. It is imperative that we recognise these barriers and acknowledge how research could be made more equitable, diverse and inclusive. Considering how we can embed equality, diversity and inclusivity (EDI) at each stage of the research process is an important first step towards creating research that is more meaningful.

In this interactive workshop we will explore practical steps in embedding EDI considerations in health professions education (HPE) research. We will look at this from two perspectives – the research process and the research team. The workshop will involve discussion, collaboration, and the opportunity for participants to consider how EDI could be embedded within their own practices.

The workshop team are members of the Education Research Committee and education researchers. The workshop will provide the opportunity to share challenges, successes and resources useful for improving EDI within health professions research. We hope that each participant will leave the session having identified one actionable step that they will take forward into their own practice.

Educational Methods:

The workshop will be structured with a series of questions and prompts for the audience to consider. Working in small groups, the participants will be able to share experiences, ask questions, and discuss ideas.

Prior to the workshop participants will be asked to complete a short Implicit Association Test (https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/Study?tid=-1) that evaluates whether participants implicitly associate good research with countries of high-income, with countries of low-income or whether it makes no difference. We will not ask participants to disclose their results. However, we will discuss implications of this test and how we can improve related practice.

The next stage of the workshop will be structured around 1) steps in the research process 2) the research team.  Facilitators will provide one example of an EDI challenge and a solution that they have considered in relation to each area as an example.  Participant groups will then be asked to work with this model to discuss additional challenges and develop solutions. This will culminate in a larger group discussion where ideas are shared and documented.

In the final stages of the workshop participants will create one actionable step that they will take forward.  We are taking this approach as we think that each of us can take small steps to improve EDI in our practice. 

Objectives & Outcomes:

By the end of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  • Reflect on their own cultural, contextual, and implicit biases
  • Locate and evaluate sources of information about increasing inclusion and accessibility in research
  • Identify an actionable step towards incorporating EDI approaches within their research

Designing and running effective ward simulation by junior doctors in the undergraduate medical education

Wednesday 12th July, 1415-1545hrs, MR5

Session Lead: Dr Mustafa Hussein Ajlan Al-Jarshawi, Mid & South Essex NHS Foundation Trust, Broomfield Teaching Hospital, @mustafaAjlan

Additional Presenters: Dr Katie Allen, Dr Mike/Mikeala Rose, Dr Lorraine Pinto

The transition from medical student to doctor is the most tumultuous time in any doctor’s career. The new doctor, although having been on clinical placements previously, now has unprecedented responsibility and is expected to quickly integrate into the dynamic multidisciplinary team (MDT). It has been noticed that some of the current teaching methods on clinical placements focus on single cases in a linear fashion and do not prepare students for the stressful, time-pressured, multidisciplinary environment of the hospital ward where conflicting priorities commonly arise and many scenarios are encountered for the first time. In this context, ward simulations can allow students to put into practice all their technical and non-technical skills as part of a ward team tackling a mounting workload.

Please come along and join us in this workshop where we will take you through consistently highly praised exemplary ward simulation run by our clinical teaching fellows team at Mid & South Essex NHS Foundation Trust (Broomfield Hospital) for final year students at Anglia Ruskin University (Chelmsford) and Queen Mary’s University of London. We will share, with live demonstrations, the best practice and evidence-based strategies underpinning ward simulation design in the contemporary clinical education with tasks that allow for workload to be progressively increased for example as tasks are generated by the ward round, patient condition fluctuates and assessment and treatment is needed, other members of the MDT have questions or require assistance and complications arise along the way.

Educational Methods:

  1. we will use introductory presentation slides and group activities to deliver workshop content aimed to achieve intended outcome 1 (see above).
  2. to meet intended outcome 2 and 3 of the workshop, we will run our in-house designed version of ward simulation for participants in this workshop to demonstrate to participants the knowledge and skills required in tailoring case scenarios from clinical practice for ward simulation with the particular learning focus of improving students’ teamwork, task sharing, efficiency, organisation, prioritisation and communication skills. In addition, we will also work with the participants on defining the key required behaviours and non-technical skills from facilitators in ward simulations and apply them. To conclude with, we will also share, in second round of team-based group activities & discussions, our evidence-based top tips for maximal engagement of students in reflective practice at debriefing session post ward simulation.

Objectives & Outcomes:

By the end of this workshop, participants should be able to:

  1. Outline the educational theory and principles of simulation and ward simulation in undergraduate medical education.
  2. Plan and run ward simulation that introduces human factors and stress performance models in ward simulation and show how students can practise the entire sequence of identifying, planning, managing and resolving ward-based problems in these simulation, an aspect that is lost when each is taught in isolation.
  3. Write up and use case scenarios for ward simulations with realistic tasks that bring students a step closer to the cumulative demand nature of foundation doctor job and their consequently competing priorities on wards in the modern NHS.

Ethics in practice: Using authentic patient stories to develop experiential learning initiatives

Wednesday 12th July, 1415-1545hrs, MR2

Session Lead: Kate Owen, Warwick Medical School, @KateOwe97816129

Additional Presenters: Dr Theresa Martin, Dr James Munro

Lived experience has a fundamental role in medical education but may appear as an added extra to illustrate a point or add interest to an educational activity. Ethics teaching often involves case examples, but rarely considers the lived experience of the patient. With complex cases in the media where doctors and carers very publicly disagree, supporting students and trainees to understand the patient view is of increasing importance.

This workshop will encourage participants to explore the range and quality of on-line patient-authored stories about their care experiences & work in small groups to develop new learning sessions starting from the narratives provided. We will be using stories & their responses from Care Opinion, a social enterprise which is contracted provider of patient feedback with over 500 NHS organisations.

We will identify 5 ethical areas then break into small groups. Each group will be given a small selection of patient stories and encouraged to identify learning areas using narrative attentiveness, then develop these into a creative and student-centred learning activity.

Each group will share their ideas. We hope that all participants will take away ideas which they can transplant into their educational practice.

We will finish with a demonstration of a project where virtual reality has been used as a tool to bring a story to life.

Educational Methods:

  • Narrative inquiry approach to patient stories
  • Group tasks including developing creative approaches to learning sessions
  • Group presentation
  • VR demonstration

Objectives & Outcomes:

Participants will:

  • Reflect on experiences of patients relating to ethical issues in practice
  • Gain an increased awareness of the range and quality of patient-authored on-line stories & their potential for learning
  • Experience designing an educational event based on lived experience
  • Share developed resources within the group to take away to put into practice
  • Appreciate and value the unique contribution of patient stories in ethics teaching

TCT logomed ed bannerExpanding Borders and Challenging Minds: Successful Peer Reviewing

Wednesday 12th July, 1415-1545hrs, Ashstead 3

Session Leads: Dr Aileen Barrett, Dr Vishna Nadarajah and Dr Kevin Eva

Becoming a peer reviewer is simultaneously an act of altruism and of self-interest. Altruistically, it provides an opportunity to contribute to the advancement of knowledge and rigour in health professional education while shaping the direction of the field and supporting colleagues in the development of their scholarly efforts. At the same time, peer reviewing allows reviewers to stay up-to-date with the latest research, expanding their own knowledge, while also enhancing their writing, critical thinking and consultation skills. Peer review is also critical in ensuring that a piece of work is viewed through diverse lenses.

This workshop will be aimed at equipping participants with the skills and knowledge necessary to become effective peer reviewers. Through interactive activities and discussions, participants will learn about the peer review process, different forms of peer review, and best practices. They will also gain practical experience in critiquing and providing constructive feedback by evaluating conference abstracts.

Workshop participants will be asked to consider the following questions and issues:

(1) How does one get started as a peer reviewer?

(2) What supports are available?

(3) What ethical considerations should I keep in mind?

(4) How can peer review help equity, diversity, and inclusion efforts?

(5) Can I become a peer reviewer if I haven’t published? The role of mentored peer reviews

By the end of the workshop, participants will have a better understanding of how to critically evaluate academic writing and be able to contribute to the advancement of health professional education through thoughtful and insightful peer review.


Levelling the field in Admissions: Making the most of virtual learning for Medicine Applicants

Wednesday 12th July, 1415-1545hrs, Tactic MR

Session Lead: Dawn Jackson, University of Birmingham, @dawnjacksonk

Additional Presenters: Dr Clare Ray, Dr Louise Hammersley

Medical schools require applicants to have a realistic understanding of a career in medicine. Direct observation of healthcare (such as shadowing a doctor at their place of work) is not attainable for everyone (1), and access to these opportunities is typically influenced by school and socio-demographic background (2, 3). However, clinical work experience has been associated with greater success in obtaining a place at medical school (4). In response to this, virtual work experience platforms have begun to emerge as a potential solution for those unable to access direct clinical work experience. In 2019, the Royal College of General Practitioners launched a virtual GP work experience, ‘Observe GP’, and the University of Birmingham was a partner institution from the outset (5). Over the past 3 years, we have been providing support for applicants on our widening participation programme; supporting them to get the most from engaging with this platform.

The application process can be stressful for applicants, and risks an ever-increasing pressure to participate in a range of activities. Despite the multiple activities undertaken, some of these have limited or variable association with success in securing a place at medical school (5). Key to our work experience support has been the provision of a group learning session before and after applicants engage with the virtual learning they encounter on the work experience platform. In the past 3 years, we have evolved our workshops to incorporate support for reflective practice, practise of communication skills, exposure to clinical skills and the involvement of our medical students in supporting our efforts to improve the socio-demographic diversity of the medical school. In this workshop, we wish to share our learning, and discuss innovative ideas to get the most from virtual work experience.

*The RCGP Membership Programme Officer has provided permission for this workshop

References:

[1] Medical Schools Council. Guidance on relevant experience for applying to medical school. 2017 update. Medical Schools Council, London, 2017.

[2] Cleland JA, Nicholson S, Kelly N, Moffat M. Taking context seriously: explaining widening access policy enactments in UK medical schools. Medical Education. 2015;49:25-35.

[3] Steven K, Dowell J, Jackson C, Guthrie B. Fair access to medicine? Retrospective analysis of UK medical schools application data 2009-2012 using three measures of socioeconomic status. BMC Medical Education. 2016;16:11.

[4] Jackson D, Ward D, Agwu JC, Spruce A. Preparing for selection success: Socio-demographic differences in opportunities and obstacles. Medical Education. 2022;56:922-935.

[5] Royal College of General Practitioners. Observe GP. Royal College of General Practitioners, United Kingdom, 2020.

Educational Methods:

Short lecture content to introduce background research:

  • outlining the rationale for the introduction of virtual work experience

Short lecture content to introduce the RCGP Observe GP platform (as an example of a virtual work experience platform)

Group discussion:

  • opportunity for the audience to undertake group learning activities that we have embedded in our workshops to support applicant engagement
  • opportunity for the audience to share their experiences of supporting virtual learning, welcoming experiences across disciplines and environments

Individual reflection: time for individuals to personally reflect on their own engagement with online material, and what they may want to take back to their workplace/learners

Objectives & Outcomes:

We aim to encourage participants to recognise the benefits of providing support for applicants to make the most of virtual work experience opportunities.  We also aim to provide some options and tools for how such support might be provided, whilst encouraging participants to tailor these ideas to their environment.

Participants will experience:

  • gain knowledge of the Observe GP platform, and the key elements included in this virtual work experience platform
  • increased awareness of the benefits of embedded workshop support to enhance applicant engagement with virtual platforms
  • learn from challenges and successes in the implementation of work experience support workshops at the University of Birmingham (related to both in-person and online learning)
  • reflect on their own institutions and practice in engagement with online material: as individual learners, and in the planning of institutional approaches to widening participation support
  • recognise the limitations of virtual work experience, and provoke a broader discussion on improving socio-demographic diversity in medical schools
  • in addition to the roles of academic staff in facilitating our workshops, we will introduce opportunities to consider how to involve undergraduate and clinical staff

We aim to encourage participants to recognise the benefits of providing support for applicants to make the most of virtual work experience opportunities.  We also aim to provide some options and tools for how such support might be provided, whilst encouraging participants to tailor these ideas to their environment.


Love and Break Up Letter Methodology (LBM): Using LBM as a creative and innovative approach to research

Wednesday 12th July, 1415-1545hrs, Main Auditorium – Affinity Suite

Session Lead: Dr William Laughey, Hull York Medical School, @billlaughey

Additional Presenters: Dr Megan Brown, Professor Gabrielle Finn

Love and Break Up Letter Methodology (LBM) is an innovative approach to medical education research with great potential to cast new light on issues and challenges within the field (1). LBM is an approach to qualitative research where participants are issued with a creative writing prompt, encouraging them to write both a love and a breakup letter to the subject of one’s research. The method offers a novel way of exploring participant experience that encourages candid opinion (2). The approach is flexible and can be used as a discussion prompt within focus groups, an elicitation device within individual interviews, and as a form of open-text question to elicit rich responses within a questionnaire. The method originates in user experience research (UX), and we co-developed this approach for medical education with the experience of a researcher from Google. In this workshop, we will share our personal experiences of using LBM to research medical student empathy, and perceptions on widening participation programmes, and offer practical tips on when and how to use LBM. Participants will have the opportunity to write love and break up letters themselves (on the topic of the conference they’re attending!), to offer insight into the approach.

References:

  1. Laughey WF, Brown ME, Liu A, Dueñas AN, Finn GM. Love and breakup letter methodology: A new research technique for medical education. Medical education. 2021 Jul;55(7):818-24.
  2. Laughey WF, Brown ME, Dueñas AN, Archer R, Whitwell MR, Liu A, Finn GM. How medical school alters empathy: student love and break up letters to empathy for patients. Medical education. 2021 Mar;55(3):394-403.

Educational Methods:

The session will take the form of an interactive seminar, in which participants will be able to discuss and ask questions the workshop facilitators, and other workshop participants. The session will begin with participants sharing their experiences of creative qualitative research methods, and an overview of the love and break up letter methodology. Participants will have the opportunity to write a love and break up letter of their own to the conference, gaining insight into the process of LBM, and reflecting and sharing on their experience as a participant in the approach. We will facilitate small group discussions on how LBM could be used to research a variety of topics, and adapted for a variety of approaches within medical education. There is no pre-requisites for attending this workshop – all, regardless of stage of training or prior experience, are welcome.

Objectives & Outcomes:

By the end of the workshop , participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the core principles of love and break up methodology and appreciate research challenges it can help combat within medical education
  2. Create love and break up letters addressed to the conference “Dear ASME ASM 2023, I love you because…”, “Dear ASME ASM 2023, I am breaking up with you because…”
  3. Discuss how love and break up letter methodology could be used within participants’ existing research interests or preferred research method

Practical application of a refined Threshold Concept Framework for medical education

Wednesday 12th July, 1415-1545hrs, MR1

Session Lead: Helen Jones, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick

Additional Presenters: Professor Lucy Hammond

The threshold concept framework (TCF) was first described nearly 20 years ago, but its application in the field of medical education has recently seen a significant growth of interest with a diverse range of literature published on the subject. The transformative nature of threshold concepts (TCs) offers potential for the design of learning experiences and curricula across the medical education continuum. Recent work in medical education has extended conceptualisations of TCs to recognise ongoing liminal states across the whole medical education continuum (Jones & Hammond, 2022). A major criticism of the TCF is the question of how it can be applied in practice. This workshop will introduce participants to our further refined conceptualisation of the TCF for Medical Education and provide practical steps as to how this can be applied and used in the development of medical education curricula and practice. Workshop participants will use interactive and participatory approaches to identify ‘stuck places’ in their own students’ learning and curriculum and explore ways to support students to navigate these issues through applying the refined framework. This workshop is suitable for educators across the medical education continuum from undergraduate, postgraduate and continuing medical education.

Educational Methods:

Session plan:

– Introduction (10 mins): Introduce participants to background of TCF and refined conceptualisation for medical education. Resources: PowerPoint.

– Identification of ‘stuck places’ (20 mins): Discussion in small groups of where participants recognise that learners get stuck in their curriculum. Resources: Handouts with prompt questions and space to make notes.

– Application of refined TCF to the medical education continuum (10 mins): Introduce participants to principles of applying framework, including to an example of a TC that presents at different points in the medical education continuum (e.g., recognising and managing uncertainty). Resources: PowerPoint.

– Ways to support student learning through stuck places using the refined TCF (40 mins): Discussion in small groups of ways that student learning could be supported in prepared examples and/or their own examples, followed by feedback and whole group discussion. Resources: Handouts with prompt questions and space to make notes, example cases.

– Developing the framework (10 mins): Discussion with whole group about how the refined TCF for medical education could be further developed.

– Feedback (after the session): Feedback on session and refined TCF. Resources: Online feedback form, QR code on handouts

Objectives & Outcomes:

– Identify ‘stuck places’ for learners in own medical education curriculum .

– Apply the refined TCF for medical education as a lens for reviewing curricula across the medical education continuum.

– Propose ways to support student development and transition through the stuck places to achieve transformative learning.

– Engage in critical discourse on the framework/conceptualisation to further develop it.


Supporting disabled and neurodivergent students and practitioners – an open discussion

Wednesday 12th July, 1415-1545hrs, Ashstead 2

Session Lead: Cleone Pardoe, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, @cleonepardoe

Additional Presenters: Sophie Edler-Buggy

Supporting disabled and neurodivergent students, trainees, doctors and medical educators is key to “future- proofing” and developing a diverse, representative work force and educational community. At Leeds Teaching Hospitals Trust, we have developed a working group to review, reflect on and make space for the necessary conversations, in an attempt to meet the needs of our student population. We present our experience of supporting disabled and neurodivergent undergraduate students at Leeds Teaching Hospitals Trust, as well as drawing upon our personal experiences of being disabled and neurodivergent medical educators.

We will present examples of the baseline standards for teaching that we have developed in Leeds as well as challenges that we have faced, specifically around disclosure and liaison with other interested parties.

In an initial group discussion, we will guide you to consider the ways in which simple changes can be made to teaching materials, language and environment to improve accessibility, inclusivity and the experience of learning and teaching for all. We hope to draw upon the breadth of knowledge and experience within the audience to collate practical wisdom and share and disseminate good practice and innovation on what can be amplified and extrapolated between different settings.

The second breakout section will involve joining a group of your choice to discuss the challenges felt by individuals with specific disabilities within a variety of clinical and non-clinical learning environments. We will consider the possibilities of specific adjustments that can be made on an individual and environmental level and discuss the pros and cons of developing departmental “menus” of reasonable adjustments.

Educational Methods:

During the workshop we will use a variety of methods to deliver the session. Initially the session will be didactic to introduce the topic and structure. This will be supported by PowerPoint. We will discuss principles of disability and neurodiversity in the workplace and for students. With this, we will introduce the current language being used and potential pitfalls. We will promote a safe and open learning environment, as we recognise delegates may have a variety of experience in this rapidly developing field. We want everyone to feel welcome and able to contribute. 

The second section will involve breakout groups which will encourage participation and we will use a Padlet (online platform) as a live resource to gather the ideas being generated from the group discussions. This will guide the focus for the rest of the session. This resource will be available for reference after the workshop as well as a means of sharing collaborative ideas. We will have three facilitators for the session to promote small group discussion amongst breakout groups.

The third section will create breakout groups based on particular work environments (e.g. undergraduate, postgraduate, clinical, university etc.) for delegates to self-assign based on experience and interest. We hope this will spark discussion about the provision of reasonable adjustments within that setting.

We will have a final summary and debrief, which we hope will leave delegates feeling confident and empowered to continue these conversations outside the ASME conference. We will make ourselves available at the end of the session if delegates feel they require further information or support.

Objectives & Outcomes:

  1. To provide information about our own experiences of supporting disabled and neurodivergent students and explore the standards set for inclusive practice at Leeds Teaching Hospitals Trust, and consider how these might be applicable to delegates in their working environments.
  2. To create a shared resource of ideas and experiences of innovative ways of supporting disabled and neurodivergent students and clinical practitioners.
  3. Encourage an open attitude to approaching difficult conversations about the language and ethos of discussing and supporting those with disability and neurodiversity.

mel uk logoSupporting quality and Educational capacity for the range of professionals in primary and community care

Wednesday 12th July, 1415-1545hrs, MR11

Session Lead: Rachel Roberts, Medical Education Leaders UK, @Rachel_Roberts0

Additional Presenters: Simon Frazer

Share principles to develop education for the range of professionals in primary care

Exemplify the accreditation processes for educators and environments at scale and for a range of professions

Consider how this helps us to develop educational capacity, quality and get to hard to reach places such as deprived areas who have not previously been training environments

Assist in empowering multi professional education

Educational Methods:

Brief introductions of the work to date and it’s governance with regulators – slides and speaker – 10 minutes

Case studies presented  (10 minutes)

Work on tables – 8-10 per table. (15 minutes), to consider

  • Pros and cons of seamless recognition of educators across all professional groups
  • Pros and cons of ability to recognise at scale and innovative environments such as primary care networks, care homes etc
  • Possible themes applicable to other educational sectors and groups

Feedback, discussion points and learning (20 minutes)

Objectives & Outcomes:

Attendees will understand

  • These new England-wide processes, and how this links with and develops from traditional postgraduate medical training
  • The connection of this work with regulators, council of Deans and medical training
  • Understand the stage of progress in their region or country, and how to get involved to support, Benefit from or develop the offer
  • Understand whether principles of this work are applicable to secondary care and undergraduate medical training for a multi professional experience and approach

The Paradigm Games

Wednesday 12th July, 1415-1545hrs, MR4

Session Lead: Sarah Allsop, University of Bristol, @sarah_a_bristol, @sarah_sociology

Additional Presenters: Sarah Mclaughlin, Steve Jennings

Have you ever considered the philosophical standpoint under which you undertake your work as an academic? How do your beliefs and experiences influence and affect your teaching or research practices? This 90-minute session will reflect our experiential journeys into the language and philosophy of qualitative research and share how gaining a better understanding of the research paradigm can improve the quality of pedagogy both teaching and research.

The session will explore concepts of aims, axiology, ontology, epistemology, rhetoric, and methodology and get participants to explore their own views and values in the context of the scholarship of learning and teaching. The session will acknowledge that the concept of the research paradigm can be challenging, and will be useful particularly to early career researchers, and those newly working in a previously unexperienced research field.

Educational Methods:

The session will use interactive techniques throughout the session, including gamification, quiz-questioning, haptic tasks as well as overview presentations. Participants will be encouraged to think reflectively about their own practice and to engage in discussion in groups. Participants will be offered the opportunity to move around the room to work with others with similar projects/ideas or to engage in conversations with those working in different areas to visualise and learn from those differences. Links to additional resources and references on paradigm will be shared electronically via a padlet. Questions will be encouraged throughout the session and can be submitted through the padlet.

Objectives & Outcomes:

Participants are recommended to attend the session with a specific research project/idea in mind to use and explore during the session.

During this session participants will:

  • unpack the nature of a research paradigm,
  • explore the philosophical concepts used in qualitative research,
  • consider the component parts of research philosophy in the context of their own ongoing projects/scholarship.

Participants will be provided with an interactive worksheet during the session and would be welcome to bring a laptop or pen and paper to make additional notes as well as being encouraged to use a padlet online tool.


The Strength of Self Compassion: The Science and Practice

Wednesday 12th July, 1415-1545hrs, MR7

Session Lead: Vidarshi Karunaratne, KCL

There is evidence to suggest self compassion practices can increase resilience, mindfulness, self compassion and compassion towards others as well as reduce negative states such as perceived stress, depression, secondary trauma and burnout. This workshop will explore some of the science behind self compassion and introduce both mindfulness and self compassion and related practices to the audience.

Educational Methods:

The session will be partly didactic and partly experiential. There will be  opportunities to practice self compassion and related practices. We will also utilize think-pair-share strategies, small group work, and whole group discussion to encourage participation and learning.

Objectives & Outcomes:

  • To gain an understanding of  some of the evidence base supporting self compassion and related practices.
  • To have direct experience of self compassion and related practices
  • How to integrate such practices into the working day

Addressing Misogyny and Sexism in Undergraduate and Postgraduate Medical Education

Thursday 13th July, 1600-1730hrs, MR7

Session Lead: Rob Cullum, Midlands’ Charter Collaborative, @RCullum91

Additional Presenters: Dasha Ibrahim, Olivia Coldicutt

In this highly interactive workshop we will be using recent research into the experiences of misogyny and sexism amongst medical students and postgraduate doctors in training to explore how we, as educators, can address this ongoing problem.

By following the journey of two learners (one student and one postgraduate doctor in training), the workshop will allow participants to work through case studies to explore approaches to support learners experiencing a micro-aggression. This will include understanding experiences of learners in the moment, reporting an incident, addressing reports with perpetrators, and looking at the bigger picture strategically.

Finally, participants will have the opportunity to consider some best practice case studies of approaches currently being used to address misogyny and sexism in medical education.

Educational Methods:

During the workshop, initially there will be an overview presentation during which recent research about experiences of learners of misogyny and sexism across the medical education continuum with be explored.

Following this, tables of participants will be asked to consider the journey of two different learners – one undergraduate and one postgraduate through an incident of a sexist micro-aggression. They will consider the situation where the micro-aggression occurs, the approach the learner takes to report it, how the report is addressed with the perpetrator, and how the learner is supported.

Finally, participants will share back their thoughts and reflections on these cases, before case study examples of good practice in this topic, applied to the cases. This will allow participants to have a wide range of ideas to reflect on and take away to their own practice.

Objectives & Outcomes:

Aim: This workshop will provide attendees the opportunity to consider how better to support learners experiencing sexist micro-aggressions by presenting a general overview of learner experiences of sexism and misogyny in the UK and then facilitating discussion of two learner journeys through an experience of micro-aggression. Finally participants will be able to explore current best practice case studies in supporting learners across the spectrum of medical education. 

Objectives:

  • To highlight current research into experiences of misogyny and sexism across the medical education continuum
  • To facilitate discussion of approaches to support learners experiencing misogyny and sexism and to address this with perpetrators
  • To support attendees to consider current best practice in this area and reflect on changes they might make in their own sphere of influence

Outcomes: Following this workshop attendees will be able to:

  • Demonstrate awareness of current research into experiences of misogyny and sexism across the medical education continuum
  • Understand approaches to support learners experiencing misogyny and sexism and addressing this with perpetrators
  • Identify areas of good practice in this topic area and reflect on how they might implement some within their sphere of influence

Building and leading large-scale programmes of clinical education research

Thursday 13th July, 1600-1730hrs, MR10

Session Lead: Nicola Brennan, University Of Plymouth, @NicolaMBrennan

Additional Presenters: Gill Vance, Aileen Barrett, Gabrielle Finn and Megan Brown

As an early career clinical education researcher you will be encouraged to develop your own programme of research that can be sustained over a period  of  time  and  that  captures your energy and enthusiasm. A programme of research is an area of high interest and passion to the person developing it. It is designed to build knowledge over time that can contribute to improved outcomes in clinical education and, ultimately patient care. Theoretically grounded research using rigorous research methodologies with clear pathways to impact are essential features of a successful programme of research.  Using a step-by-step approach this workshop will help you to think about building your own programme of research as well as providing practical advice on leading large-scale programmes of research. The workshop will draw on the organizer’s experiences of leading  programmes of clinical education research funded by the National Institute for Health Research Health Services and Delivery Programme.

Educational Methods:

Small group work

Objectives & Outcomes:

By the end of this workshop you will:

  1. Be aware of the different aspects required for developing a successful, impactful programme of research in clinical education
  2. Have identified what area(s) you will need to develop in order to further your own ideas for a programme of research
  3. Have learned from the experiences of principal investigators on leading large-scale programmes of research

IAMSEBuilding Diversity, Equity, and Inclusivity and into the Medical Sciences Curriculum

Thursday 13th July, 1600-1730hrs, MR5

Session Lead: Neil Osheroff, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine; IAMSE

Additional Presenter: Zhi Xiong Chen

To develop a future workforce that is diverse, culturally prepared, and equity minded, it is critical to build issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) into the medical curriculum. It is important to begin this process as early as possible, which means embedding DEI into pre-clerkship courses, and continuing it throughout the medical curricula. If DEI topics are truly to resonate with students, they cannot be reserved for clinical courses and workplace learning. Thus, it is imperative to embed topics such as social determinants of health, inclusivity, and equity into medical science courses. How can this be achieved in an ever-crowded curriculum, jostling for space with other important interdisciplinary topics, and often appearing to be disconnected from medical sciences? This workshop will address these questions. It will provide practical examples of how DEI topics can be incorporated purposefully throughout the curriculum, side-by-side with the learning of medical sciences, and end with a discussion on current and potential obstacles and how we can hopefully overcome them.

The workshop will begin with an interactive large group session that explores DEI from an international perspective. It will then describe approaches for incorporating DEI into medical science courses across the curriculum. Four activities will follow:

  1. Participants will discuss how DEI is being embedded into their curricula.
  2. Attendees will work in small groups to discuss different strategies for integrating DEI with medical science materials in a variety of curricular settings. Participants will share strategies and themes that they identified.
  3. Participants will discuss how DEI may change in the future and how these changes may affect the roles of faculty. This will be followed by a report back to the large group.
  4. Participants will develop individual action plans for the application and implementation of new strategies at their institutions.

Educational Methods:

The workshop will utilize interactive large group discussions as well as directed small group interactive learning.

Objectives & Outcomes:

This interactive workshop will provide educators with practical information and tools to help them foster the integration of DEI into the medical sciences curricula at their institutions. It is targeted at curricular leaders, course directors, and administrators who have responsibilities for designing medical student experiences. We believe that faculty involved in all aspects of the curriculum will benefit. After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe approaches for explicitly incorporating DEI and medical science topics across the medical curriculum.
  2. Compare and contrast the use of multiple strategies for integrating DEI topics into medical science courses.
  3. Develop an action plan to implement newly acquired strategies at their home institutions.

Harnessing story-telling to learn from underserved populations: opening eyes, hearts and minds

Thursday 13th July, 1600-1730hrs, MR11

Session Lead: James Fisher, Newcastle University

Additional Presenters: Nony Mordi, Richard Thomson

Story telling is human nature. Yet in medical training there is often a focus on students learning to synthesise a person’s rich, sometimes messy story about their life, into a flat, aseptic, clinical account of a patient’s symptoms. Whilst this approach may help learners handle the complexity of symptomatology, it risks losing sight of the story’s central character, as the person is transmogrified into ‘the patient’. This may underpin the recognised attrition in empathy seen during undergraduate medical programmes.

Stories, be they written, visual or spoken, are a powerful way to learn. Rita Charon, general internist, literary scholar, and originator of the field of narrative medicine, described it as “a commitment to understanding patients’ lives, caring for the caregivers and giving voice to the suffering”. We contend that narrative medicine can be a catalyst for truly meaningful learning about underserved populations and health inequality, be it racism, ageism, gender bias and sexism, hetero-normism, colonialism or stigmatised medical conditions.

Addressing these areas is an absolute priority. There is a pressing need to normalise diversity, to embed concepts of social justice and accountability within curricula[1] and to produce graduates who are culturally competent and better able to understand and serve the needs of the diverse populations they serve.

In this workshop we aim to distil the key concepts of narrative medicine in a user-friendly way and will draw on the collective experience and expertise of delegates to aid its implementation at the coal-face of teaching practice.

 Reference: Pitama, S. and Thistlethwaite, J. (2021), Diversity, inclusivity and equity. Clin Teach, 18: 447-448.

Educational Methods:

This workshop will rely on a mixture of small-group teaching techniques. Didactic content will be limited, and restricted to a brief ‘theory burst’, presenting a user-friendly summary of the theory and evidence that underpins the use of story-telling in education practice. For the majority of this workshop participants will work in small groups with discussion supported by facilitators. Tasks will be constructed to promote equity in participants’ contribution (e.g. snowball exercise). Prompts for discussion will include an online video (Heider and Simmel’s 1944 animation), framed photographs of notable people/stories in medical history and authentic clinical materials that present a patient’s story in differing formats. A collaborative exercise will be undertaken to generate a collection of resources suitable for use in teaching in this area. With participants’ consent, this list of suggested resources (with no participant information recorded) will be used to form part of a future written submission to The Clinical Teacher Journal’s ‘toolbox’ series.

Objectives & Outcomes:

In this workshop, participants will:

  • Experience, through interactive tasks, how humans cannot help but find stories in the everyday.
  • Discuss how teachers can help learners to understand how different people experience the world differently.
  • Work collaboratively to identify potential resources that can be used to reveal the experiences of, and foster connections with, people ‘othered’ by healthcare systems.

Inclusion in the curriculum: tools, toolbox and toolkit

Thursday 13th July, 1600-1730hrs, Tactic MR

Session Lead: Yvonne Mbaki, University of Nottingham,

Additional Presenters: Dr Rakesh Patel

A number of global events over the last 18-24 months have highlighted that not everyone is equally affected by them, and those most affected, may also not have equal access to the same opportunities to manage or cope with them.

In the context of medical education, the global pandemic affected some students more than others. Certain groups experienced particular difficulty accessing both formalised teaching activities delivered as part of the planned curriculum, as well as extracurricular and social activities informally organized outside the classroom.

We developed a toolkit to increase access and participation in the curriculum, comprising multimedia-rich narratives from students and staff about their experience of equality, diversity and inclusion. Faculty-wide case studies were drawn from different multi-professional and disciplinary backgrounds to ensure the widest representation of medical science educators. We now want to share this toolkit with others as we move from local implementation to national and international dissemination.

The rationale for this workshop is therefore to support participants increase inclusion in their curricula. Acknowledging students are diverse and from different backgrounds, the aim is to help medical science educators identify ways to make teaching content and curricula more inclusive, including sharing a toolkit co-developed by learners and educators.

Educational Methods:

  1. Lecture: Introduction. Brief overview describing the rationale and purpose of the focus session with examples of policy drivers for increasing inclusion within medical science curricula from a UK higher education context.
  2. Small group discussion: ‘What does an inclusive curriculum mean to you’ and ‘why does increasing inclusion in the curriculum matter?’
  3. Demonstration: Description of the journey and toolkit ‘walk through’ developed as a collaborative co-designed endeavour between students and staff within the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Nottingham (UK). The purpose of this demonstration will be to showcase the provision of a supportive resource for medical science educators and learners to use as part of their efforts in developing a more inclusive curriculum within their practice.
  4. Small group discussion: Discussion on drivers and barriers that help or hinder the implementation of an inclusive curriculum.
  5. Reflection: Sharing learning with considerations of translating this to practice.

Objectives & Outcomes:

Our intended objectives and outcomes for the participants attending the workshop will be to:

  • Recall the drivers for increasing inclusion in the curricula, with specific attention on making teaching content and assessment more inclusive for all learners
  • Critically reflect over a definition of what an inclusive curriculum means in practice
  • Identify drivers and barriers that may help or hinder the implementation of an inclusive curriculum
  • Share a toolkit co-designed by learners and medical science educators for embedding inclusion into the curriculum
  • Provide an opportunity for reflection on the application of learning to current practice

TASME Logo RGB 1TASME Teaching Innovation and Excellence Prize

Thursday 13th July, 1600-1730hrs, MR8

Session Lead: Sean Zhou, Trainee Association for the Study of Medical Education (TASME), @_SeanZhou

Additional Lead: Cleone Pardou

Join us for presentations of shortlisted prize winners of our annual TASME Teaching Innovation and Excellence Prize (TIE). This is always an excellent session to hear about the latest and hottest innovations in education.

After years of COVID, many of us have had to respond and change the way we deliver teaching, and this has led to dynamic shifts in how we teach and think about teaching. Get ideas for your next project, be inspired by innovations that you could apply to your practice, and enjoy some truly high quality talks that are created to impress our judges.

Educational Methods:

There will be a series of presentations, and the candidates are aware they need to deliver a high quality talk to grab the interest of both judges and attendees. There will be plenty of time for questions and interactions which often happens given how innovations and new technologies tend to stimulate discussion.

Objectives & Outcomes:

  1. To experience the highest quality of teaching innovation over the last year
  2. Be a part of experiencing the TASME TIE Prize
  3. Get ideas for change in education practice, or research ideas and find future collaborators

Presenter details to follow


Teaching and learning within multidisciplinary teams – strategies for success

Thursday 13th July, 1600-1730hrs, MR9

Session Lead: Sonia Bussey, Newcastle University, UK, @SoniaBussey

This workshop is aimed at teachers, educationalists and learners who would like to explore the benefits and challenges of teaching and learning in teams derived from a wide variety of professional backgrounds. Practical strategies for getting the best out of working within a mixed team will be explored, and there will be an opportunity for participants to share good practice and develop action plans for particular dilemmas.

Educational Methods:

Large group presentation, think-pair-share activity, small group discussions, summative interactive plenary.

Objectives & Outcomes:

By the end of this session, participants will:

  • Have an overview of some key benefits and challenges of working with others from different professions in a teaching and learning environment.
  • Have considered practical strategies for getting the best out of multidisciplinary team working.
  • Have had the opportunity to share their perceptions and experiences of working in multidisciplinary educational teams.

TEL Logo RGBThe Promise, Pitfalls and Practicalities of Introducing Immersive Technology to Medical Education

Thursday 13th July, 1600-1730hrs, Ashstead 1

Session Lead: Richard Bamford, Somerset Foundation NHS Trust, @richbamford81

Additional Presenter: Terese Bird

This workshop has been developed and supported by the ASME TEL SIG

The prevalence of immersive technologies (360-degree video, VR and AR) in the medical education and training sphere is increasing rapidly, expanding the potential for capitalising on their pedagogical advantages but also introducing disadvantages. As with many ‘early stage’ technologies, there is a challenge for educators needing to get hands-on experience of these tools to explore their prospective learning affordances yet being limited by prohibitive cost and/or low availability. As experience has shown, popular technologies can grow more quickly than the opportunities available for robust pedagogical evaluation and research with the risk of wasted resource, inadvertent increase of exclusion, and detrimental net benefit to learners. It is vital that the medical education community engage with evaluation, share their experiences, and promote robust scholarship so we can work together to promote a beneficial, inclusive and diverse learning environment.

This workshop will provide fellow educators with the opportunity to hear about real life examples of immersive technologies in different education settings including delivery of simulation-based education (SBE) to Foundation Doctors, pre-course SBE for undergraduates, and training in trauma and orthopaedics management. Participants will have the opportunity to try out different immersive tools for themselves, gaining hands-on experience. The workshop provides a forum for attendees to share experiences, discuss the possibilities and pitfalls, and explore scholarship methodologies in this emerging area.

This workshop is for anyone who is new to the world of immersive technologies in learning who wish to explore them in real life. It is also for those who are already exploring them and can share their experiences with their fellow educators to benefit all participants.

Educational Methods:

The workshop will use a presentation format followed by task-based practical exploration of example tools and technologies then discussion among the whole group to maximise shared learning.

Objectives & Outcomes:

The objectives of this workshop include to:

  • Increase knowledge and understanding of how immersive technologies can be applied in real education and training situations;
  • Gain hands-on experience of example technologies and tools to develop understanding of their potential for application in other settings;
  • Increase awareness of potential advantages, limitations, and dangers when using immersive technologies in education;
  • Increase connections with fellow educators working in this area to strengthen the network of scholarship and benefit learners.

PPP logoHello my name is…

Thursday 13th July, 1630-1730hrs, Main Auditorium – Affinity Suite

Session Lead: Pluto Plays

‘Hello my name is…’, a play inspired by the life and work of the late Dr Kate Granger, explores the dynamic realities of human interaction in health and social care. Dr Granger’s insistence that individuals whose business it is to deliver health care should always introduce themselves to their patients by saying, “hello, my name is…” It was a powerful call for dignity and identity in healthcare, born of her own experiences as a cancer sufferer and patient.

Amidst the shock and heartbreak of her own experience, Kate’s outlook was transformed when a hospital porter introduced himself with simple sensitivity: “Hello, my name is Brian…” Kate felt her self-worth rising and a campaign that would find global acceptance was born.

Commissioned by St Gemma’s Hospice in Leeds, where Kate died on their 11th Wedding Anniversary, ‘Hello My Name Is…” takes a close look at the lives of Kate and her husband Chris. Through the use of humour and pathos, they made a compelling case for a simple but transformative approach to the delivery of essential health care services.

AoMEA Review of Entry-Level Medical Education Roles (ELMERs) in the United Kingdom

Friday 14th July, 1015-1215, MR1

Session Lead: Lisa-Jayne Edwards, Academy of Medical Educators, @lja_ed

Additional Presenters: Dr Claire Stocker, Dr David Hettle

Entry-Level Medical Education Roles (ELMERs) refer to first-time roles occupied by doctors with the primary responsibility to provide teaching; it is estimated that there are hundreds of ELMERs (Ker et al, 2018) and have been cited as “the future of medical education”. Anecdotal evidence suggests that there is considerable disparity between roles across the UK and between institutions; this impacts upon the ELMER post-holder, the learners and the profession as a whole. In the first review of its extent, The Academy of Medical Educators (AoME) is currently investigating the current landscape ELMERs in the UK so that this disparity can be identified and addressed.

The review is taking place two phases:

Phase 1: Using an inductive approach, a review of written job adverts, job descriptions and person specifications covering a 12-month period (June 2021 to May 2022) to determine the scope of ELMER definitions and practice.

Phase 2: A series of interviews/focus groups with current and recent ELMER post-holders to explore and contextualise the findings from Phase 1.

This is a prospective abstract: we hope to present our findings from Phase 1 of our review alongside a more detailed methodology for qualitative study in Phase 2.

We hope that our findings will reveal the current scope of ELMER recruitment practice, responsibilities, available opportunities/funding and salary.

The Academy of Medical Educators would like to invite key stakeholders to attend this session, so as to communicate what is known about ELMERs in the UK before facilitating a discussion regarding the implications of our findings further.

We hope that discussions amongst experts in this session will help inform next steps in defining and

quality-assuring ELMERs for not only the post-holder, but for learners and the profession at large.

Educational Methods:

We hope to engage the audience with interactive presentation, facilitated discussion and open Q&A.

We will be glad to utilise any available the interactive conference app.

Objectives & Outcomes:

We would like to:

  1. communicate our findings to key stakeholders
  2. facilitate discussion around the implications of this review
  3. drive consideration of how ELMERs are defined and quality-assured in the UK

Co-production and patient involvement: How do we get it right?

Friday 14th July, 1015-1215, MR4

Session Lead: Elizabeth Susan Anderson, University of Leicester, Medical School, @Liz_Anderso

Additional Presenters: Amber-Bennett-Weston, Dr Kate Owen

Along with all health and social care professional curricula, medical schools are expected to involve patients and carers to share their lived experiences.1 Recent reviews highlight that while medical schools are making progress, there is still a lack of theoretical evidence about best practice and how to sustain and value patients as true partners in faculty.2,3  We still know very little about how to form a diverse patient community within a healthcare school that is supported, integrated, and valued.

The workshop aims to enable all participants to debate and discuss how to create and sustain patient involvement that is meaningful for patients, students, academics and clinical staff. We will discuss the following questions: 1) How does your school involve patients and carers in curriculum design, delivery and assessment? 2) Are you guided by the Spectrum of Involvement? 3) What biases and pre-conceptions do we hold about patient involvement? Patients and students will be welcomed to take part in the session.

The overall outcomes will result in a publication sharing the work of a range of medical schools, acknowledging participants’ input.

References:

  1. General Medical Council. Outcomes for Graduates. London, GB: General Medical Council; 2018.
  2. Bennett-Weston A, Gay S, Anderson ES. A theoretical systematic review of patient involvement in health and social care education. Adv in Health Sci Educ. 2022;1-26. doi:10.1007/s10459-022-10137-3
  3. Gordon M, Gupta S, Thornton D, Reid M, Mallen E, Melling A. Patient/service user involvement in medical education: a best evidence medical education (BEME) systematic review: BEME Guide No. 58. Med Teach. 2020;42(1):4-16. doi:10.1080/0142159X.2019.1652731

Educational Methods:

Participants will be helped to construct new knowledge and to reflect on their understandings as follows:

Introduction (10 minutess): The team will briefly share findings from a PhD study which has explored the views of patients/carers, faculty and students on involvement. We will briefly share the patient and carer work at Leicester and Warwick medical schools. The team will acknowledge that despite excellent progress we are all learning together about what works well and why.

Group work (60 minutes with 20 minute rotations). Participants will be asked to work in a Café style approach rotating around three tables on which there will be posters with the main workshop questions for participants to complete. There will be patients and/or carers with students at every table along with a workshop lead who will stimulate group interactivity and ensure thoughts are recorded. Patients will be able to share their stories of what it feels like to be involved in healthcare education and students of what it is like to attend learning sessions led by patients.

The three questions are:

  1. How does your school involve patients and carers in curriculum design, delivery and assessment?
  2. Considering the aspirations of the Spectrum of Involvement – does this resonate with you?
  3. What biases and pre-conceptions do we hold about patient involvement?

Summary: Workshop participants will then come together to share the main findings (20 minutes)

Objectives & Outcomes:

Aim: To debate and discuss how to create and sustain patient involvement that is valued by patients, academic and clinical staff and students.

Objectives

  • To explore how medical schools involve patients and carers
  • To debate guidance literature such as the Spectrum of Involvement
  • To examine our biases and pre-conceptions about patient involvement

Outcomes

  • Participants will receive summaries of the debates and discussions
  • To publish the groups discussions as workshop findings in a relevant journal and through ASME acknowledging the groups in-put

Participants will forward their knowledge on recent research on partnership working with patients. Through debate and discussion participants will have an opportunity to reflect on their attitudes towards involvement, while learning new skills from each other on best practice.


ERC - Education Research CommitteeResearch Paper Award 2023 Finalists

Friday 14th July, 1015-1200, Ashstead 3

Session Chair: Dr Anita Laidlaw

This session gives the shortlisted applicants a chance to present their paper, followed by a chaired question-and answer session. The aim of this event is to showcase high-quality medical education research, to recognise the presenters, and to enthuse and inspire delegates.

1015hrs Welcome & explanation of criteria for judging presentations, introduction of the panel.

(15 minutes talk and 10 minutes Q&A per paper)

1020hrs You may think that the consultants are great, and they know everything, but they don’t: exploring how new Emergency Medicine consultants experience uncertainty.

Anna Collini,  KCL @drcollini

1045hrs Experiences of patient death: voices of new graduate doctors in the COVID-19 pandemic

Emma Farrington, Newcastle University

1110hrs (L)earning: exploring the value of paid roles for medical students

Johhny Callaghan and Katrina Freimane, Queens University Belfast  @KatrinaFreimane @JohnnyCa11aghan

11.35 – 1150 Panel discussion; winner announced at the end of the session and in close of conference .

1200 Close 


Widening participation for the doctors of tomorrow. Maximising the impact of a medicine with foundation year program

Friday 14th July, 1015-1215, Ashstead 1

Session Lead: Andy Cook, Leicester University Medical School,

Additional Presenters: Dr Sam Adcock

This workshop is aimed at anyone interested in widening participation to medicine through ‘medicine with foundation’ programmes.

This interactive session will encourage attendees to share experiences and explore how medicine with foundation programs can best help prepare students from widening participation backgrounds, for medical programs and their future lives as the doctors of tomorrow.

We will consider a number of areas relevant to foundation programs including ‘selecting’, ‘belonging’, ‘equipping’, and ‘content’, exploring – what is needed, what is wanted, and what is possible in each area, and does it really matter?

The session will also include opportunities for attendees to discuss potential future developments and possible collaborative working between institutions.

Educational Methods:

Format of session:

Short presentation, followed by interactive discussions in ‘world café’ style small groups, followed by plenary session for group feedback.

Timeline:

15 minutes – presentation to introduce the topic and background of widening participation programmes to medicine, describe the elements of the Foundation to medicine program at Leicester Medical School, and hear from an ex-foundation program student about their experience of the program.

45 minutes – four small group discussions each with a different topic focus. Topics for discussion will be:

‘Selecting’ – factors influencing ‘successful’ recruitment of students into foundation year programs

‘Belonging’ – factors influencing foundation student’s sense of belonging, identity and support<

‘Equipping’ – factors influencing student learning, maximising potential, and student progression

‘Content’ – what is needed, what is wanted, what is possible, and does it really matter?

20 minutes – plenary where each group will have 5mins each to present a summary of ideas

Objectives & Outcomes:

Participants will:

  • Gain an understanding of the components of current foundation programs
  • Consider factors contributing to ‘design’ and ‘success’ of a foundation year program
  • Explore ideas and opportunities for further development of programs
  • Consider opportunities for collaborative working between institutions.

TCT logomed ed bannerWriting for publication

Friday 14th July, 1015-1215, Main Auditorium – Affinity Suite

Session Leads: Dr Aileen Barrett and Professor Karen Mattick

Writing for publication in health professions education is an important skill, essential in developing an evidence base of practice, for broad dissemination of findings and raising the quality of healthcare education. Submission to peer-review is a defining component of scholarly practice and proof of writing success is often a requirement for promotion when applying for funding and providing evidence of professional impact. However, for both novice and experts alike, writing for publication can be a challenging experience as competition for publication is fierce and the standards in the field continue to rise.

In this workshop journal editors share their knowledge of the field of publishing and tricks of the trade for maximizing the likelihood of publication success. They will aim to provide a glimpse of what goes on ‘behind the scenes’ of the publication process in an effort to unravel some of the mysteries of peer review and increase understanding of what it takes to publish in health professional education journals specifically, relative to the broader scientific literature.

Workshop participants will be asked to consider the following questions and issues:

(1) What problems are commonly encountered?

(2) What makes a good paper? Why do papers get accepted or rejected?

(3) What happens to a paper during the review process?

(4) Ethical aspects of publication.

Through this they will gain knowledge regarding what health professional education research journal Editors are looking for, how to maximize the chance of publication success, and strategies for writing clearly.

ASME Pop ups Icon Oct22What’s Popping Up

We are pleased to be able to share the details of the Pop Up events within the conference. Delegates will be able to sign up to attend these events on the day.


A menu of educational innovation

Healthcare education and other postgraduate programmes present particular opportunities and challenges for those teaching on them – partly deriving from organisational/positional issues but to some extent, perhaps, due to the limited evidence base regarding the impact of what we do, why and how it plays out in the workplace. In this inclusive session, we will further develop our community of practice, aiming to build capacity in scholarship and research. We will present a ‘smorgasbord’ of small-scale projects at various stages of completion, as well as a collaborative proposal in the making. We hope you will join us.1 Pop Up Denny Path Design pic 1

Who should attend?

Anyone with an interest in Postgraduate Taught Programmers in Medical/Clinical/Health Education, and/or research scholarship around the PGT programmes. Alumni and current students on such programmes will be specially invited so that they can share their experiences.

Where/When?

Friday 14th July 2023 / 0900-0945hrs / Ashstead 1

Event Lead(s):

Jane Rowe, Annie Noble-Denny, Ana Da Silva

Institution(s):

University of Bristol


Do ‘Training the Trainers’ courses work? Opportunities and challenges for developing educators in the NHS.

Do you contribute to, or run, a ‘Training the Trainer’ course in the NHS? What works well and what doesn’t?   Does your course engage clinicians, develop educational skills and enhance training? Are we catering for the needs of new and experienced educators?  In 2019, we explored good practice and overcoming the challenges of training and developing good clinical and educational supervisors. Since then, much has changed.  The ASME Educator Development Committee (EDC) invites you to come and share ideas for good practice in effective ‘Training the Trainer’ courses and explore how the EDC might support trainer development in the NHS.2 Pop Up EDC Training trainers pic 1

Who should attend?

Anyone involved in developing and delivering ‘training the trainer’ programmes for postgraduate medical education, clinical and educational supervisors, those involved in, or responsible for, trainer development in the NHS.

Where/When?

Friday 14th July 2023 / 0900-0945hrs / Ashstead 2

Event Lead(s):

Dr Catherine Bennett and the EDC

Institution(s):

University of Warwick and ASME EDC Chair


From ‘ticking the boxes’ to meaningful conversations in postgraduate supervision

The guidance for postgraduate clinical supervision is well-developed, but implementation in practice does not always reflect the intentions of the profession.  In the pressures of the clinical environment, learning opportunities can pass by, and supervisory interactions can risk becoming ‘tick-box’ to satisfy programme requirements. We want to change the conversation within postgraduate workplace learning towards the pursuit of ‘meaningful conversations’ in our workplaces and supervision.    In this session we’ll aim to explore literature and theory on supervision to provide a springboard for discussion, recognising the challenges that arise in deeply complex and diverse clinical learning environments.3 Pop up Jackson NEW

Who should attend?

We’d like to encourage postgraduate trainees, supervisors and those involved with the planning and implementation of training to attend.

We’re particularly interested in hearing from those who want to improve experiences of postgraduate supervision either for themselves (as trainees or supervisors), or for others (as programme leads or those developing curricula).

Where/When?

Friday 14th July 2023 / 0900-0945hrs / Ashstead 3

Event Lead(s):

Dr Dawn Jackson & Dr Eva Hennel

Institution(s):

University of Birmingham & University of Bern, Switzerland


Teaching Clinical Skills: Sharing best practice

Whether you teach basic history and examination skills, beside teaching, practical procedures or simulation, we would love to meet and share best practice in the field of teaching clinical skills with you. This pop up event will provide an opportunity to share ideas, meet like minded teachers and discuss how we can form a network / special interest group of all things clinical skills.4 Pop up Muscroft teaching clinical skills pic 1

Who should attend?

Any educators who are involved in teaching clinical skills or students who may have done peer teaching or have some good ideas about how we dab teach it better!

Where/When?

Friday 14th July 2023 / 0900-0945hrs / MR 4

Event Lead(s):

Lindsay Muscroft

Institution(s):

Warwick Medical School


The Road Less Travelled: Networking for those with diverse career paths within medical education

Medical education is a melting pot of perspectives, as it attracts clinicians, non-practicing clinicians, sociologists, psychologists, anatomists – the list goes on. Though the field is made richer by diverse perspectives, there is little peer support for those with “less travelled” career paths. We, the presenters, who are non-practicing clinicians, have found great support in connecting with others on similar paths, or who are interested in similar paths. This pop-up event will be a space to connect with others with diverse (and perhaps, “wandering”) career paths across clinical academics, non-practicing or ex-clinicians, and those with interdisciplinary perspectives.5 Pop Up Brown Road less travelled pic 1

Who should attend?

Anyone who would identify with having a “less travelled” or “wandering” career path within medical education. Open to clinicians, non-practicing or ex-clinicians, and those from diverse disciplinary backgrounds across the health professions. Open to individuals at any career stage. You don’t have to have made the switch to a less travelled path to attend, you might be considering a career move that would set you on such a path.

Where/When?

Friday 14th July 2023 / 0900-0945hrs / MR 1

Event Lead(s):

Megan Brown, Helen Church, Anna Collini

Institution(s):

Imperial College London; University of Nottingham; Kings College London


Virtual Reality (VR) in Trauma and Orthopaedics

Immersive technology offers pedagogy based on constructivism and experiential learning. It provides an opportunity to elevate the ceiling of learning objectives through active and stereoscopic exploration of anatomy which helps students appreciate its complexity. Using Microsoft HoloLens headset, we will enable learners to step into the  immersive Holohuman app and interact with a lifesize, three-dimensional (3D) human hologram. Learners will be guided through clinical scenarios to analyse the potential complications of musculoskeletal trauma and apply that to the management of these scenarios. You can choose to come as a group and interact with the Holohuman collaboratively or a solo explorer.6 Pop Up Aws Musculoskeletal pic 1

Who should attend?

5th year medical students.

6th year medical students.

Foundation doctors

Where/When?

Friday 14th July 2023 / 0900-0945hrs / MR 2

Event Lead(s):

Aws Almukhtar

Institution(s):

Imperial College London


Xrays R Us!

Clinical Imaging is the corner stone of modern Clinical Medical Practice. This is recognised by its inclusion in the GMC MLA content map as one of the top 7 most examinable Conditions against this. Yet Clinical Imaging has an almost non existent foot print in the curriculum. This leaves a large gap in the UK Student Learning Needs to be met by 2025. How can we solve this problem quickly? We will make the case of why Clinical Imaging is integral to all aspects of Medical Student Education. We will be show casing and using the MLA focused free learning online resource to show how easy it is to deliver this teaching. There will be open Q+A discussion about how we can improve, what Clinical Imaging teaching is available for attendees and what barriers exists.7 Pop Up Chew Xrays pic 1

Who should attend?

Although primarily aimed at Medical Student educators, Clinical Imaging is ubiquitous to all aspects of Health care and Healthcare education. As such, all specialties and health care educators of all levels welcome! Lets work together to embed Clinical Imaging into all aspects of Health Care Education. This will (1) Help the learners learn their specialisms through the use of Imaging to better understand what is normal and what is pathological (2) Help learners to know the limits of imaging investigations and (3) When to use what imaging.

Where/When?

Friday 14th July 2023 / 0900-0945hrs / Tactic Meeting Room

Event Lead(s):

Dr Cindy Chew

Institution(s):

University of Glasgow

ASME Symposia Icon May22

We have various symposia scheduled throughout the conference: please see below for more info

You can sign up to attend these sessions on the day they are being held, on a first come, first served basis.

Expanding Admissions Diversity Efforts to include Disability

Keywords: Admissions, EDI, Assessment, Disability, Technical Standards
Theme: Admissions
Symposium Chair: Dr Lisa Meeks, University of Michigan @meekslisa
Additional Contributors: Ms Grace Clifford, Dr Erene Stergiopoulos
Date, time and room: Wednesday 12th July, 1000-1115hrs, MR9

The medical profession is challenged to produce a workforce that is representative of the population, including the 20% of people worldwide with disabilities, yet medical school recruitment efforts rarely include students with disabilities. Indeed, students with disabilities are deterred from applying to medical school by nebulous technical admissions standards for admission; highly ableist medical model of disability that narrowly defines and limits ideas about who is qualified and capable of practicing medicine; and a dearth of mentors and specialized disability advisors who understand how to properly determine clinical accommodations. This panel of leaders will address 5 of the largest barriers for students with disabilities. Using a case-based review, each panelist will discuss a distinct roadblock to admissions and simultaneously present mechanisms for removing these barriers.

Barriers include:

  1. Discriminatory and outdated technical standards
  2. Poor messaging and clarity about how to request accommodations
  3. Ableism and bias in the admissions decisions
  4. Poor understanding of performance of learners with disabilities
  5. Poor understanding about the value of disability inclusion

In order to truly practice disability inclusion, medical schools must first dismantle the first barrier to medical education—admissions; these barriers are partially grounded in long-standing, systematic and attitudinal beliefs about disability. Strengthening admissions for students with disabilities, understanding disability as a unique and necessary contributor to a diverse and inclusive workforce, and valuing the contributions of lived experience of disability are first steps towards a more inclusive physician workforce.

The following items will be covered with presenter in (). Discriminatory and outdated technical standards. (Lisa Meeks); Poor messaging and clarity about how to request accommodations. (Grace Clifford); Ableism and bias in the admissions decisions; Poor understanding of performance of learners with disabilities. (Lisa Meeks); Poor understanding about the value of disability inclusion. (Erene Stergiopoulos)

Gearing up for the CPSA – a toolkit for delivery

Keywords: CPSA, Validity, Reliability, Training, MLA
Theme: Assessment
Symposium Chair: Sam Thenabadu, King’s College London @4hrEmergencydoc
Additional Contributors: Dr Helen Oram, King’s College London; Dr Vikki O’Neill, Queen’s University Belfast;  Dr Kathy Cullen, Queen’s University Belfast
Date, time and room: Wednesday 12th July, 1000-1115hrs, MR1

UK medical schools are currently liaising with the GMC to quality assure their Clinical and Professional Skills Assessment (CPSA). They must demonstrate compliance with the CPSA requirements before the end of 2023.

This Symposium is a CPSA Delivery Toolkit, designed to support schools in the preparation, logistics, content and analysis of clinical assessments.

The symposium will have a very practical focus. The presenters will discuss station topic selection, sampling from the Medical Licensing Assessment (MLA) content map, quality assurance and equality, diversity and inclusion. There will be tips to ensure consistency across multiple sites and resources to help maximise station reliability and validity. We will consider how to prepare your students, simulated patients, examiners and administration and invigilation team. The essentials of CPSA psychometrics and student-focused feedback will be outlined clearly.

The team are mindful that every University will have a unique approach to the exact nature of the clinical assessments and the CPSA will vary in station length, mark scheme style and nomenclature. There has been considerable consternation regarding site readiness to deliver a GMC MLA CPSA-compliant examination locally. This a timely and likely highly desirable practical symposium option in the run up to the CPSA.

Dr Kathy Cullen (Respiratory Consultant, Assessment Lead, Queen’s University Belfast (QUB), GMC Associate MLA reviewer for the CPSA) will share concepts/tips for producing consistent, relevant, EDI aware and reliable individual clinical assessment ‘stations’. She will focus on OSCEs but the principles are transferrable to other formats.

Dr Helen Oram (Haematology Consultant, Deputy Assessment Lead and MRCP/MRCPath Senior Examiner, GMC Associate MLA reviewer for the AKT) will discuss troubleshooting and consistency including tips on preparation of simulated and real patients, examiners and students. She will consider intra-station concordance and inter-site consistency.

Dr Vikki O’Neill (Psychometrician and Deputy Assessment Lead QUB) will outline the essential psychometric data which should be analysed post-CPSA. She will also share her unique Psychometrics dashboard and feedback tool.


Building Inclusive Learning Environments for Learners with Disabilities: A Global Perspective

Keywords: Access, Disability, Diversity, Inclusion
Theme: Equality, Diversity and Inclusivity (EDI)
Symposium Chair: Dr Lisa Meeks, University of Michigan Medical School @meekslisa
Additional Contributors: Dr Neera Jain, University of Auckland; Dr Duncan Shrewsbury, University of Brighton; Lise Mogensen PhD
Date, time and room: Wednesday 12th July, 1415-1545hrs, Ashstead 1

The number of medical students and doctors who experience disability entering the profession has increased in the last decade, sparking debate around inclusion in education and practice. In the last 4 years, five medical associations, including the Association of American Medical Colleges and the American Medical Association’s Council on Medical Education (US) (US), the British Medical Association and General Medical Council (UK), and the Medical Deans of Australia and New Zealand (AUS, NZ), have reported a need, and issued calls for action for medical education to be more inclusive in our approach to education, training and supporting practice.

Learners with disabilities are an important, under-discussed, and under-served part of our professional community. Medical schools are actively seeking guidance to address gaps in policy and training in building inclusive and accessible environments. Confusion and misconceptions persist regarding disability and the ability of individuals identifying as disabled to practice medicine.

This session comes on the heels of several international reports and allows the global audience to dig deeper into the variables affecting disability access for trainees.

Participants will leave the sessions understanding:

1. Barriers exist for learners with disabilities that are structural and cultural in nature.

2. Program access via accommodation or reasonable adjustment are critical to academic success, wellbeing, and positive learning environments.

3. Resources exist to assist medical educators in creating accessible environments.

Medical education researchers from 3 countries, including contributors to the aforementioned reports, will present current research through the lens of 2 case studies. Specific discussions include Ableism (Neera Jain) Mental Health, Bias and Stigma (Duncan Shrewsbury) and Accommodations and Program Access (Lisa Meeks).

Hidden aspects of widening participation: uncovering the needs of students

Keywords: widening access; widening participation; differential attainment
Theme: Equality, Diversity and Inclusivity (EDI)
Symposium Chair: Dr Eleanor Hothersall, University of Dundee @e_hothersall
Additional Contributors: Dr Helen Oram, Kings College London; Dr Kathy Cullen, Queens University Belfast; Ms Donna Quinn, University of Edinburgh; Dr James Galloway, Kings College London
Date, time and room: Wednesday 12th July, 1415-1545hrs, MR9

Widening participation (WP) or widening access are terms for increasing recruitment of students from non-traditional backgrounds into professional education and careers. The driver behind this is to create a more balanced workforce, which has better representation of the populations that the healthcare system serves (1).

However, non-traditional backgrounds are often more deprived: materially and educationally, and it is common for students from WP backgrounds to describe struggling to fit into the education system. WP students identify many barriers which have been previously overlooked, such as understanding the complex hierarchy of medical education. In addition, WP students are often more financially precarious, meaning they have paid work in addition to their studies, or they may have caring responsibilities which require significant additional time. These issues may mean that students are unable to achieve their academic potential.

This symposium presents a number of case studies from UK undergraduate medical education, offering an opportunity to improve the experience of WP students, by exposing the hidden aspects of their experiences.

The symposium will consist of short case studies, followed by a panel discussion with Q&A involving participants. The case studies will come from UK medical schools with experience of WP (Kings College and Queens University Belfast), and include a summary of policy work across Scotland to support WP students (University of Edinburgh). Findings from a recent survey of final year medical students will be used to explore the relationship between hours worked outside medical studies (paid employment, volunteering and caring responsibilities), income, and academic achievement. The potential impact of changes to teaching, such as shift work and weekend working, will be highlighted. The symposium will finish with a call to action for participants, to identify the hidden barriers for their students, and to work to expose and address them.

Exploring and remediating unconscious bias and discrimination: An interactive, participant-led, results oriented exercise

Keywords: Unconscious Bias, Discrimination, Exploring Remediating
Theme: Equality, Diversity and Inclusivity (EDI)
Symposium Chair: Dr Gilles de Wildt, University Of Birmingham; NHS (Locum GP Cape Hill Medical Centre)
Additional Contributors: Associate Clinical Professor Sabena Jameel, University of Birmingham, GP Church Road Surgery, Aston;  Dr Suhail Tarafdar, Senior Clinical Lecturer, GP Small Heath Medical Practice, Birmingham and North Worcestershire GP Training Programme Lead; Anoushka Ramkumar, 4th Year Medical Student, alumna BMedSc Global Health, University of Birmingham;  Dr Miriam Addo, FY1,  Founder Birmingham African Caribbean Medical Society, Alumna BMedSc Global Health
Date, time and room: Thursday 13th July, 1600-1730hrs, MR1

There is increased awareness of socio-economic & health inequalities and discrimination based on race, ethnicity, (post)colonial legacies and gender. The Birmingham Medical School BMedSc Global Health Programme developed an academic and personal approach to explore these challenges and articulate remedial action in medical student-led exercises.  Students  prepared  and delivered presentations, followed by responses by medical educators and a peer leading senior medical student and discussion, in a two and a half hour session.

The four presentations centred on: 1) Personal experiences with discrimination – as a subject or witness; 2) Perspectives from different diasporas in the UK; 3) A short role play where a delegation from Ghana scrutinises mental health provision for children and adolescents in the UK, responded to by the UK government; 4) Practical suggestions for improvements in teaching and training.

A shortened version of this exercise was run with Netherlands based “Doctors of International Health  and Tropical Medicine” in the context of their mandatory peer education. Findings: Participants had the vocabulary to explore these challenges respectfully without losing clarity of purpose. Practical suggestions were made vis-a-vis  teaching, training  including  “safe spaces” to explore unconscious bias in small groups of 4-6 persons.  Authors believe this exercise is  replicable and adaptable for different disciplines and settings in the world.

In this symposium, after a short introduction, participants will be divided in groups of 4 to 6, to explore the issues from different viewpoints, followed by a plenary discussion and recommendations to medical educators and ASME.

Miriam Addo, Anoushka Ramkumar, Sabena Jameel, Suhail Tarafdar will be respondents and small group facilitators. One of them will deliver a short introduction.  Gilles de Wildt will chair and facilitate a small group

Making judgements about competent, confident, collaborative, compassionate doctors in diverse populations

Keywords: Assessment; progress; variable progression; judgements; competence
Theme: Assessment
Symposium Chair: Prof Jacky Hayden, Academy of Medical Educators @HaydenJacky
Additional Contributors: Dr Kim Walker, Aberdeen University, Prof Colin Melville, General Medical Council
Date, time and room: Thursday 13th July, 1600-1730hrs, MR4
This symposium will challenge the current system of evaluating the progress of postgraduate trainees through a numerical approach to workplace based assessments. It will explore how judgements can be made consistently to understand the confidence and competence of trainees in the workplace (clinical, educational/academic and leadership roles). Participants will be able to explore potential confirmatory bias, particularly in relation to doctors who have trained outside the UK or come from ethnic minority backgrounds. The discussion will be set against the current background of workload pressure in the health and care system, exploring how to maximise opportunities for growth in the trainee population.

Colin Melville

Will bring a unique perspective from the General Medical Council, particularly the current thinking on variable progression and ensuring equity in trainee assessments. He is also in a unique position to assimilate the perspectives of the participants in formulating national thinking.

Kim Walker

Has extensive experience in leading and influencing national thinking in postgraduate curricular and assessment. In particular, she will contribute her knowledge of assessment of progress to challenge the current system.

Jacky Hayden

Has many years’ experience working in postgraduate medical education. She will bring her understanding of the development of the current system and the steps needed to skill the training workforce (including all the professional groups working with the trainee)  to be confident and competent in articulating their observations and sharing them with the trainee.


Recognizing and Addressing Ableism and Bias in Health Professions Education

Keywords: Admissions; EDI; Disability; Ableism; Assessment
Theme: Admissions
Symposium Chair: Dr Lisa Meeks, University of Michigan @meekslisa
Additional Contributors: Dr Erene Stergiopoulos, Ms Grace Clifford, Dr Duncan Shrewsbury, Dr Neera Jain
Date, time and room: Thursday 13th July, 1600-1730hrs, MR2

Disability is an important element of diversity and brings unique benefits to patient care. Despite an unprecedented growth in this population and efforts to create more inclusive environments, deeply entrenched ableist belief systems continue to impact admissions, school-based policy, assessment, accommodation decisions and career counseling. Creating an awareness of ableism and how it manifests in medical education is the first step in helping stakeholders recognize, respond to, and dismantle ableism-informed barriers. This session will review the concept of ableism and engage participants in a discussion about how ableism impacts the experience of learners from admissions to graduation.

Learning Objectives:

Define ableism and provide 3 examples of ableism in health professions training.

Identify ableist-driven barriers for trainees with disabilities.

Describe actions, language, and processes that create anti-ableist learning environments.

Presenters will review the largest barriers to inclusion for learners with disabilities in health professions education including: admissions, school-based policy, assessment (Stergiopoulos), accommodation-decisions (Clifford) and career counseling (Shrewsbury).

Square peg, round hole: behavioural and social sciences in a medical curriculum

Keywords: Psychology, Social Science, Medical Curriculum, Problem-based Learning, Multidisciplinary
Theme: Psychology
Symposium Chair: Professor Lisa Jones, Three Counties Medical School, University Of Worcester @tcms_worc
Additional Contributors: Professor Rebecca Stack, Three Counties Medical School, University Of Worcester; Dr Bere Mahoney, Three Counties Medical School,  University Of Worcester; Professor Kay Mohanna, Three Counties Medical School, University Of Worcester; Professor Sandra Nicholson, Three Counties Medical School, University Of Worcester
Date, time and room: Thursday 13th July, 1600-1730hrs, Ashstead 2

Incorporating ‘ologies’ that do not fit into body systems, such as behavioural and social sciences (BSS), in a medical curriculum is challenging. 1  These subjects usually end up in self-contained modules, which leaves many medical students perceiving them as disconnected and tangential to the ‘core’ learning of anatomy and physiology. 2  The development of the new graduate-entry MBChB at the Three Counties Medical School (TCMS) offered an opportunity to do things differently.

TCMS aims to develop doctors with patient-centredness at the heart of their care.  As such, BSS is not a curriculum ‘add on’ but is integrated from the outset.  The underpinning pedagogy of TCMS MBChB Phase 1 (years 1 and 2) is guided problem-based learning (PBL) based around patient presentations organised by body systems.  Each year of the course is a single multi-ology module with integrated assessment.

We led the integration of BSS in the Phase 1 curriculum, with little published pedagogical literature to guide us.  Our challenge was to negotiate the integration of medically-relevant BSS topics at clinically-relevant points within a busy and vast spiral curriculum, at a level and ordering that will make sense to graduate students with little prior knowledge who are learning via blended PBL.  We will critically reflect on our methods and outcomes, both successes and misfires, and our experiences of working within the multidisciplinary and multi-ology curriculum development group.  We will invite discussion with the audience to arrive at shared recommendations for improving BSS learning within medical education.

Professor Rebecca Stack will critically review the BSS content of the GMC’s Outcomes for Graduates (2013) in the context of other national guidance for the BSS content in medical degrees.

Professor Lisa Jones will critically review the TCMS approaches and methods of integrating BSS outcomes and learning resources in the MBChB PBL curriculum.

Dr Bere Mahoney will reflect on her experiences as an experienced BSS scientist based in a different academic school contributing to the TCMS MBChB curriculum development.

Professor Kay Mohanna will address some of the challenges, and joys, of leading the development of a fully integrated MBChB curriculum with a multidisciplinary and multi-ology curriculum development group.

Professor Sandra Nicholson will contribute a Dean’s perspective on developing a new medical school with an integrated curriculum, particularly addressing issues of interfacing with existing academic schools and processes in a university.


Supporting Access, Success and Progression of Medical Students and Doctors From Non-traditional Backgrounds – a National Medical Schools Widening Participation Forum

Keywords: Widening Participation; Widening Access; Transition; Socio-economic disadvantage
Theme: Equality, Diversity and Inclusivity (EDI)
Symposium Chair: Dr Clare Ray, University of Birmingham @drCJRay
Additional Contributors: Dr Enam Haque, Dr Louise Alldridge, Dr Mandy Hampshire, Ms Halimah Khalil
Date, time and room: Thursday 13th July, 1600-1730hrs, Ashstead 3

The Millburn Report (2012) highlighted medicine as a career for the privileged with only 7% of medical students coming from the lowest socio-economic group, while 22% were educated in independent schools (vs 7% for the whole population). Despite improvements over the last ten years (MSC, 2019), inequalities in access to medical school, student success while studying (e.g. awarding gaps and access to extracurricular and enrichment activities) and progression through post-graduate training remain.

For individuals from lower socio-economic backgrounds, inequalities in social, cultural, and economic capital generate barriers at every stage of the pathway to becoming a doctor. Inequalities include access to support for achieving high academic grades, navigating the application process for medical school, and transition to and engaging with all aspects of university life while studying. Inequalities do not stop upon graduation but persist through transition to post-graduate training as a junior doctor and career progression, meaning that some pathways are only open to more privileged individuals.

To address these inequalities, in 2015, the National Medical Schools Widening Participation Forum was formed. With over 100 academics, admissions tutors, outreach staff, assessment bodies, charities, medical students, and junior doctors, we work together to widen access to the medical profession. This symposium will discuss the evolution of this organisation and how it has worked to improve the access, success and progression of medical students and doctors from disadvantaged backgrounds and will highlight how close collaboration with medical students and junior doctors has enhanced our work to widen participation in medicine.

Dr Enam Haque, will discuss how the NMSWP Forum evolved from a subgroup of a regional admissions organisation to a nationally influential organisation. He will also discuss the key principles underpinning the success of the organisation, and its unique position of providing a holistic student journey approach to widening participation.

Dr Louise Alldridge, will discuss the importance of contextualising admissions and foundation years in widening access to studying medicine at university. The UKWPMED collaborative contextual admissions programme involving six UK medical schools and which is led by the Forum will be highlighted.

Dr Mandy Hampshire, will discuss the challenges faced by medical students from widening participation backgrounds while studying and during their transition to their first jobs as doctors. She will provide an insight into application to the UKFPO from a WP perspective and also highlight the impact of the  #LiveableNHSBursary campaign which the Forum has supported.

Ms Halimah Khalil, will discuss the important role that medical students play in supporting the access and success of medical students from widening participation backgrounds and the role that the National Student Widening Participation Conference, which is organised by the student committee of the Forum, plays in providing opportunities for leadership, collaboration and a national network of Widening Access to Medicine societies.


Using the rainbow to part the clouds: reflection to navigate greyness

Keywords: Reflective Practice, Dealing with Uncertainty, Professional Identity, Wisdom, Phronesis
Theme: Reflection
Symposium Chair: Dr Sabena Jameel, University of Birmingham @sabenaj
Additional Contributors: Professor Jacky Hayden, Academy of Medical Educators, FMLM, Plymouth NHS Trust; Professor Linda de Cossart, Ed4MedPractice Ltd
Date, time and room: Friday 14th July, 1015-1215, Ashstead 2

Our multicultural and multi-professional workforce bring their own values and beliefs to patient care; the current pressures in the NHS and the complexity of many of the patients seeking care can be overwhelming. Medicine has become more complex than ever. One of the responsibilities of our educators is to offer techniques and resources to those learning with them to help them navigate a path which will encourage them to be patient focused, maximise resource and remain true to their professional values.

Using the research base of developing professionalism, the symposium will offer participants insights from the three speakers. Interactive discussion will be encouraged, exploring how the delegates might use reflection and other educational resources in navigating these tensions, both personally and as an educator. We hope that in learning how to ‘part the clouds’ the peaks of Maslow’s and Millers pyramids become an attainable objective. Providing heuristics that aspire to assist learners to practise to a consistently high standard, sharing decision making with their patient and using NHS resources effectively. Most importantly aligning with their values, contributing to professional wellbeing.

1) Prof Hayden – Professionalism and value conflicts & tensions

This presentation will explore the importance of both the teacher and the learner understanding the ways in which they can judge the effectiveness of the interaction between the clinician and their patient and the importance of exploring the grey areas; potential tensions between personal values, patient preferences and available resources.

2) Dr Jameel – Reflection and Wisdom in dealing with uncertainty/professional virtues and the wise doctor

Phronesis (Practical wisdom) is an intellectual virtue that helps adjudicate underpin clinical reasoning when values conflict. It is about decision making with a moral orientation. Modern medicine is fraught with these tensions and uncertainties. The GMC have made dealing with uncertainty and an outcome for graduates, but how well do medical educators prepare learners for this? Effective reflection with an orientation towards growth and deepening understanding is essential for developing our wisdom. Dr Jameel will outline her insights from empirical research on wise clinicians.

3) Prof de Cossart – Moral and technical mode of practice/educator professional identity/rainbow writing & transformative reflection as a tool to deal with uncertainty

This talk will clarify the terms moral and technical mode of practice and offer the Mountain of Educational Practice and a philosophy which has underpinned teaching in this way. It will emphasise the importance of all teaching and reflection taking account of the exploring Being, Knowing, Thinking, Doing and Becoming of the learner and thinking like a teacher. It will introduce the educational resource of Rainbow Writing and Transformative Reflection as practical activities to navigate and explore the nuance and greyness of everyday medical practice.

ASME Oral Presentation Icon Oct22

ASME Whats your point Icon Oct22

ASME Award Feb21 v2 no web address

The parallel session timetables of abstract oral presentations, What’s Your Point? presentations, ASME award winners’ presentations along with some other intra-conference sessions are available below.

Wednesday 12th July 1630-1730hrsThursday 13th July 1600-1730hrsFriday 14th July 0900-0945hrsFriday 14th July 1015-1215hrs

The VenueParking and Low Emission ZonesAccommodation

ASME’s 2023 ASM will be held at Eastside Rooms (2 Woodcock Street, B7 4BL), Birmingham’s newest conference venue that combines innovation with Birmingham’s industrial heritage.

 

Floorplan 1

Affinity Floorplan



Visitor Parking at The Eastside Rooms

Please see Millennium Point Multi-Storey Car Park (B4 7AP) online for further details.

Please note that parking for Aloft Birmingham hotel and The Eastside Rooms is within the Birmingham Clean Air Zone.

Visit brumbreathes.co.uk to check if your vehicle is exempt from the daily charges and how to pay (must be no later than 6 days after the first day you travel within the zone).

Aloft Birmingham Eastside accommodation.

ASME delegates rate is available until Monday 1st June 2023.

Book HERE.

Accessibility

We aim to ensure that people have equal access to this event. If you need alternative formats or other reasonable adjustments, please contact (Gillian Wells) via email: events@asme.org.uk with your request by 16th June 2023 so that arrangements, where possible, can be made.

The Eastside Rooms is committed to ensuring all visitor requirements are catered for and enabling all our guests to access every part of the venue.

As well as being the only venue in Birmingham to offer a fully equipped changing places toilet, our staff are highly trained to provide assistance to any visitors who require it.

Assistance dogs are welcome at the Eastside Rooms. We kindly ask for you to discuss any requirements you or your dog may have with the Eastside Rooms in advance of your visit.

Please visit: https://eastsiderooms.com/about/accessibility/ for more information related to accessibility in the venue.

All ASME events are planned and run utilising our EDI Checklist. Please see HERE to view. 

View our Accessibility Guide for ASME’s workshops, presentations and e-Posters.

Sustainability

ASME won’t be providing single-use cups for water so please, bring your own reusable cup! Don’t forget your chargers and adaptors so you don’t have to buy an unnecessary spare.

All emails informing submitters about their oral/e-Poster/session submissions have now been sent out. If you have received an email please check your spam/junk initially and then email events@asme.org.uk if you still don’t have the email.

If your submission has been accepted please read on…

We can’t wait to see you in Birmingham. We have a request – although we try to be as helpful &inclusive as possible, we’re receiving multiple requests for specific timings. Please see below for an appeal from the events team.

We can’t wait to hear all about your research and scholarship. Please bear with us with scheduling…we need to know if you are attending so we can group and allocate slots to all the accepted talks. It is not possible to offer preferences for days and times as we are coordinating over 400 abstracts. We know some times are preferable to others but we do state that if you submit, your abstract could be scheduled at any time during the conference. There is no avoiding this. Please return your abstract acceptance ASAP. If you can’t make your time, you are able to withdraw or nominate another presenter. We look forward to seeing you all in Birmingham. Thank you.

View our Accessibility Guide for ASME’s workshops, presentations and e-Posters.

 

 

Abstract GuidelinesAbstractsIntra-Conference SessionsSymposiumWhat’s your point? SessionsPop-Up Events

Call for Abstracts (Oral and E-Poster)

You are invited to submit abstracts of papers concerned with research and new concepts in undergraduate, postgraduate and continuing medical and healthcare education, for the Annual Scholarship Meeting. One of ASME’s goals is to foster and promote high-quality education research and the ASM is an important mechanism in this programme. There are 2 categories of presentation.

oral1 – Oral Presentation

This section is for new ideas and researchers wishing to have a forum to present their work in a parallel session and receive feedback during the session. The standard format will be to allow 10 minutes for presentation and 5 minutes for comments and feedback. This section will be limited both by quality standards, but also time available, and the assessment panel will award the presentation slots to those submissions of the highest quality.

View our Accessibility Guide for ASME’s workshops, presentations and e-Posters.

e poster2 – E-Poster Presentation

E-poster presentations are invited for research and innovations that have not been developed to the completeness required for oral presentation. Presenters of papers accepted as e-poster are expected to speak about their e-poster(s) during the programmed chaired e-poster session. Where submitters have more than one e-poster accepted we would advise that either a co-author presents your other paper(s) or you indicate which of your e-posters you will present in the session. E-poster competitions will be held and you will be given the option to indicate whether or not you wish to be included in the competitions.

If your e-poster is accepted your full instructions on format etc. will be sent at this time.

View our Accessibility Guide for ASME’s workshops, presentations and e-Posters.

Accepted abstracts will be published in the abstracts e-booklet and abstracts submitted by individual and institutional ASME members will also be published in the supplement of the journal The Clinical Teacher, which will be published in late 2023. By submitting your abstract, you consent to give ASME permission to publish it. 

Guidelines for submissions:

  • Submissions may address issues of concern/development at all stages of medical and healthcare education
  • The abstract should indicate the main conclusions of the paper
  • The abstract should not be more than 250 words in length (excluding title, authors and references)
  • Whilst we recognise that members may wish to submit abstracts on work in progress, as part of the scoring process, assessors will take into account whether results are included within the abstract
  • The assessors may consider your paper to be worthy of inclusion in The Educator Development Committee “Innovative, interesting and prize winning work”. This session will be a showcase for innovations in learning and teaching in medical education. If this is the case you will be informed and given the option to accept or not.
  • There will also be an option to have your submission considered for the Special Interest Group Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) parallel session and e-poster session, which explore TEL activity in medical education. Please use the correct selection on the abstract submission form to indicate your preferences in the Abstract Theme field
  • There will also be an option to have your submission considered for a number of different prizes – please indicate your preferences on the abstract submission form
  • Up to 3 quoted references cited in the abstract should be listed at the end, and the AMA (American Medical Association) reference style should be followed
  • You must submit your abstract via the online website submission process (detailed on “Abstract Submission Form” tab)

Assessors will judge submitted abstracts on the following criteria:

  • Originality
  • Validity of the research design or educational innovation/development
  • Inclusion of data and where appropriate an evaluation of the educational innovation or development
  • Applicability of results to practice
  • Importance and relevance of content for a national and international audience

Abstracts Submission Terms & Conditions

  • All correspondence relating to your submission will be sent to the abstract submitter/corresponding author only
  • The submitter must be the presenter/session participant
  • A maximum of 6 co-authors can be listed
  • Quoted references in the paper cited in the abstract should be listed at the end, and the AMA reference style should be followed.
  • All submissions are final on receipt. No amendments will be permitted to your abstract after it has been submitted, therefore please ensure all data, including author and speaker details, is correct at time of submission
  • Up to 2 speakers/presenters may be indicated for each abstract (Oral or E-Poster)
  • The lead author & session presenter/participant must register and pay the registration fee by the close of the Early Bird deadline (or have registered and have made arrangements to pay the registration fee prior to arrival) in order to guarantee inclusion in the programme
  • The lead author & presenter/session participant should be available to present at any time during the conference, no preferences for day/time of presentation can be accommodated due to scheduling complexities
  • Abstracts that are not accepted in the category (oral or e-poster) to which they were originally submitted, may be considered for presentation in other categories as appropriate. Authors will be informed which category submissions have been accepted in to and given the opportunity to confirm or decline to present
  • No feedback is available on abstract assessment
  • Accepted abstracts will be published in the abstracts e-booklet and abstracts submitted by individual and institutional ASME members will also be published in the supplement of the journal The Clinical Teacher. By submitting your abstract, you consent to give ASME permission to publish it.
  • ASM certificates will be provided to delegates within 30 working days of the end of the conference.
  • The details you put on the submission form will be used to create your certificate. No changes can be made once your certificate has been issued
  • If you fail to attend the ASM your abstract will not be published

The ASM organising group may vary formats to create themed sessions which will allow for more discussion of papers that address similar issues.

Abstracts of all accepted presentations will appear in the conference papers for the ASM on our website in the lead up to the conference.

Submissions close at 12 noon (GMT) Tuesday 24th January 2023. No extensions will be offered.

ASM 2023 Prizes

When submitting your abstract you have the option to opt-in to be eligible for the following prizes:

  • ASME ASM Communication Prize
  • JASME ASM Communication Prize
  • TASME ASM Communication Prize
  • TEL ASM Communication Prize

Please visit the awards page for full details and criteria for eligibility for each prize

Submit your abstract

e poster oral

Submissions close at 12 noon (GMT) Tuesday 24th January 2023. No extensions will be offered.

View our  Accessibility Guide  for ASME’s workshops, presentations and e-Posters.

ASM abstracts step-by-step guide

  1. Please read these instructions carefully. Please don’t forget to read the T&Cs both for abstracts and registration!!
  2. Prepare your abstract
  3. Read the text of your submission thoroughly and make sure you have added all the information. Submitting an abstract is a multi-step process. Each step asks several questions. Some questions are marked “required” and you will not be able to complete your submission until these questions have been answered or all information has been inputted in the correct format.
  4. Read the text of your abstract thoroughly and when you’re ready, click on submit!
  5. You will then receive an email with the confirmation that the abstract has been received. Have another look at the details of your submission at the bottom of the email, just as a final check! Remember that the email you’ve used to submit the abstract is where ASME will send all notifications related to your submission so, please keep an eye on it (and on your spam folder too, just in case)! If you notice a mistake in your submission, please e-mail abstracts@asme.org.uk. No changes will be allowed when the abstract submission period finishes.
  6. After the deadline for submissions, all abstracts will be assessed. Please be patient, this process requires time! You will hear from us as soon as all abstracts have been assessed.
  7. Once the assessment is completed, all submitting authors will receive an email indicating the acceptance or rejection of their abstract(s). If you submit two abstracts, you will receive two separate e-mails, each one confirming the acceptance or rejection of each abstract.
  8. If you receive an email confirming your abstract has been accepted, don’t forget to answer confirming that you accept the offer for oral or e-poster presentation and the details of the abstract (title, main author, co-author(s), presenter(s)).
  9. If you don’t answer by the deadline provided in that e-mail, we will assume you don’t wish to attend the ASM and your abstract will be withdrawn.
  10. Please make sure you register for the ASM by 12 June 2023. If you don’t do so, we won’t be able to include your presentation in the conference programme and your abstract won’t be published.
  11. The details of your presentation (date, time and room) will be sent in another email before the conference.
  12. Accepted abstracts will be published in the abstracts e-booklet and abstracts submitted by individual and institutional ASME members will also be published in the supplement of the journal The Clinical Teacher. By submitting your abstract, you consent to give ASME permission to publish it.
  13. You will then present your abstract either as an e-Poster or orally in the parallel sessions. You can view our Accessibility Guide to prepare your presentation.
  14. Bring the file of your presentation to the venue on a USB stick on the day you’re presenting and take it to the speakers’ preview room.
  15. CPD and presentation certificates will be sent to the corresponding author’s email within 30 working days of the end of the conference. Please note that the presentation certificates include the name of all authors and presenters. Don’t forget to forward it to your co-authors!

ASME abstracts terms and conditions

  • All correspondence relating to your submission will be sent to the abstract submitter/corresponding author only
  • The submitter must be the presenter/session participant
  • A maximum of 6 co-authors can be listed
  • Quoted references in the paper cited in the abstract should be listed at the end, and the AMA reference style should be followed
  • All submissions are final on receipt. No amendments will be permitted to your abstract after it has been submitted, therefore please ensure all data, including author and speaker details, is correct at time of submission
  • Up to 2 speakers/presenters may be indicated for each abstract (Oral or E-Poster)
  • The lead author & session presenter/participant must register and pay the registration fee by the close of the Early Bird deadline (or have registered and have made arrangements to pay the registration fee prior to arrival) in order to guarantee inclusion in the programme
  • The lead author & presenter/session participant should be available to present at any time during the conference, no preferences for day/time of presentation can be accommodated due to scheduling complexities
  • Abstracts that are not accepted in the category (oral or e-poster) to which they were originally submitted, may be considered for presentation in other categories as appropriate. Authors will be informed which category submissions have been accepted in to and given the opportunity to confirm or decline to present
  • No feedback is available on abstract assessment
  • Accepted abstracts will be published in the abstracts e-booklet and abstracts submitted by individual and institutional ASME members will also be published in the supplement of the journal The Clinical Teacher. By submitting your abstract, you consent to give ASME permission to publish it
  • ASM certificates will be provided to delegates within 30 working days of the end of conference
  • The details you put on the submission form will be used to create your certificate. No changes can be made once your certificate has been issued
  • If you fail to attend the ASM your abstract will not be published

Submit your abstract

intra conference sessionsSubmissions of intra-conference session proposals are now closed.

#ASME2023 intra-conference session proposal guidelines

Intra-conference sessions should be designed to encourage lively debates, stimulate the production of new ideas and the discussion of issues. They should promote and disseminate effective learning and teaching activities in medical and healthcare education through a practice activity and/or interactive based format. Proposals should be designed to attract an audience of a maximum of 40 delegates, to cover more precise topics than the main plenary sessions.

If your submission is successful you should be prepared to present your intra-conference session at any time during the conference, we cannot guarantee a specific day or time until closer to the conference.

Submission Instructions:

Complete the online form by Friday 9th December 2022.

Criteria for evaluation:

  • Completeness – do we need further details of the submission?
  • The nature of the intra-conference session – are the objectives clear?
  • Intra-conference session format – does it include significant opportunity for practice and interactivity?

Review Process:

Submissions will be checked for completeness and appropriateness for the criteria.  Proposers will be given feedback about incomplete submissions, and the chance to confirm details if there is time to do so before the deadline for application. Submissions will be assessed by an assessment panel. Authors of rejected submissions will be given feedback on why the workshop was not supported.

Important – Submission Requirements for intra-conference sessions:

  • Intra-conference sessions submissions are final on receipt. No amendments will be permitted to your session descriptor and lead details after submission
  • All session leads must register and pay the registration fee by the close of the Early Bird deadline (or has registered and made arrangements to pay the registration fee prior to arrival) in order to guarantee inclusion in the programme
  • Only 3 maximum leads may run a workshop (all of which should be ASME institutional or individual members)
  • The submitter must be the session lead
  • The lead(s) should be available to present at any time during the conference, no preferences for day/time of presentation can be accommodated due to scheduling complexities
  • If accepted, your intra-conference sessions should last a maximum of 90 minutes
  • NOTE: No intra-conference session lead(s) have the authority to cancel their conference session(s) on-site.  Programmed intra-conference sessions must go ahead as per conference schedule regardless of attendee level

symposium e1671041418358

Submissions close 12 noon (GMT) Tuesday 24th January 2023. No extensions will be offered.

ASME invites submissions for symposia at our ASM. This is a panel presentation and discussion on a theme of interest or debate.

  • Symposia will be 90 minutes
  • Each will have one chair, and up to 4 contributors
  • All symposia contributors, including the chair, must be attending the ASM
  • The chair will introduce the session, then each contributor will present their element. This section must not exceed 60 minutes
  • There must be 30 minutes allocated for questions from attendees, and a panel or general discussion

Submit now

What's your point?Submissions close at 12 noon (GMT) Tuesday 24th January 2023. No extensions will be offered.

ASME invites submissions for our ‘What’s your point?’ sessions. These are short presentations on a topic of interest or debate. Think soapbox, or speaker’s corner, and don’t be afraid to challenge thinking.

  • ‘What’s your point?’ presentations are 10 minutes, followed by 5 minutes of questions
  • A maximum of 2 presenters are permitted
  • Slides are permitted but we urge you to think creatively when using visual aids
  • You should choose topics that will spark interest and debate
  • This submission type is not suitable for research presentations

Submit now

Popups

Submissions of Pop-Up event proposals are now closed.

Pop-Up Events at the ASM 2023

#asme2023 #asmepopups

ASM 2023 Popups

ASME invites you to submit your event for inclusion in #asm2023

Some feedback from the inaugural pops ups in 2018:

“Loved the pop-up sessions. Very interesting – well run and has given me so much food for thought”

“Excellent format for a discussion of a wide variety of med ed issues. Will be one to use in future practice”

“Amazing! Practical, learnt lots, very engaging” 

Idea sharing, network focused and always collaborative …

  • Do you have ideas that you would like to share with others?
  • Perhaps you are looking for research / teaching collaborators?
  • Would you like to develop a new ASME Special Interest Group?

This could be ‘YOUR’ pop up event at the conference.

This networking opportunity puts you and the room together: you advertise for “guests” with whom you can showcase your ideas and share interests. Follow the instructions below to get your message out.

45-minute slots are available at #asme2023.

What to do next?


Step One

Complete the simple online form by Friday 9th December 2022 to request a slot (We will attempt to accommodate as many requests as possible)

Step Two

Once your pop-up has been accepted, prepare a portrait A4 poster to advertise your event

(Include: date, time and room details, the #asme2023 and #asmepopups and the ASME logo and send it to events@asme.org.uk by Friday 31st March 2023 (Make it colourful and interesting!)

ASME will promote via mailings and social media the Pop Up Events, but no guarantees on attendance numbers can be given. Please make your event description as eye-catching and attractive as possible to encourage interest.

Step Three

On your allotted day your poster will be displayed on the door of your allocated room and at the #asme2023 registration area where people can sign up on the day to attend. (Your event will also be advertised in the conference papers and on social media using #asme2023 and #asmepopups)

Step Four

Be in the room at the relevant time and engage your colleagues!

 Step Five

Collect and send feedback to events@asme.org.uk on how your pop up event went

Step Six

Take a bow! 

Whilst ASME supports the Junior Doctors in their aims to secure a pay deal,  our ASM scheduled for the 12-14th July 2023 will go ahead as planned.

Calendar of Events

ASME Events

26 April 2024
ASME Research Methodology Group: Lunchtime Journal Club April
9 May 2024
EDI in educational research and supervision
15 May 2024
Online Zoom Interactive Workshops - Spring 2024

ASME BITESIZE Events

24 April 2024
Choppy waters: how educators can support their learners to navigate healthcare uncertainty
30 April 2024
Engaging allied health professions in clinical education research: barriers, opportunities, and enablers

Non-ASME Events

24 April 2024
Recent Advances of Young Onset Dementia
27 April 2024
'Reframing WP': National Medical Schools Widening Participation Conference 2024
21 May 2024
Interprofessional Diabetes Course for Healthcare Professionals