ASM 2014

General Information

General Information

Education, Scholarship and Leadership in Pursuit of Excellent Patient Care

To be held at The Brighton Centre, Kings Road, Brighton UK.

Background

The ASME Annual Scientific Meeting encompasses the continuum of education, from undergraduate through postgraduate and continuing medical education. The conference will include the usual excellent opportunities for delegates to discuss innovations in medical/healthcare education.

Opportunities to network with colleagues

This conference is a forum for all medical/healthcare educators with undergraduate, postgraduate or CPD responsibilities and interests. It is an opportunity to report and discuss themes, research and initiatives with colleagues from the UK and abroad and will be of interest to all those involved in medical/healthcare education and training.

Conference Format

The ASM includes:

  • Conference workshops
  • Large group sessions
  • The Lord Cohen Lecture
  • Presentation of discussion papers and members’ abstracts
  • JASME events
  • Meet the experts
  • Institutional members’ forum
  • Presentation of the New Researcher Award
  • Presentation of the Sir John Ellis Student Prize
  • Members’ poster presentations and poster competition
  • Annual General Meeting
  • Presentation of the ASME Gold Medal for outstanding contribution to medical education
  • Commercial and academic exhibitions relevant to all aspects of medical/healthcare education
  • Social programme 


Welcome Reception Wednesday 16th July

The Brighton Museum , Royal Pavilion, Brighton

Set in the heart of the city’s cultural quarter, Brighton Museum & Art Gallery is located in the Royal Pavilion gardens.  Its rich collections and exciting exhibits are dynamically displayed in stimulating surroundings.

The Welcome Reception will be held within the Brighton Museum from 7-9pm where canapés and drinks will be served.

Annual Dinner Thursday 17th July

The Grand Hotel, Kings Road, Brighton

Standing proud on the Brighton promenade, gazing out across the glittering sea, the Grand has an allure all of its own. More than a hotel, this is an institution, an iconic piece of British history. Victorian splendor, breathtaking sea views, sumptuous service and decadent cuisine. 

Join us for pre dinner drinks at 19.30 with a 3 course dinner with wine at 20.00.

Fees

Delegate Fees

Please note all fees quoted are in pounds sterling.

Day(s) attending Members Non Members Undergraduate Students
Whole 3 day conference including Welcome Reception £460.00 £500.00 £210.00
Buy One Get One Free Undergraduate Student offer* - - £210.00*
Wednesday Only £220.00 £240.00 £150.00
Wednesday + Welcome Reception Only £245.00 £265.00 £175.00
Thursday only £220.00 £240.00 £150.00
Friday only £180.00 £200.00 £110.00
Wednesday & Thursday only £390.00 £420.00 £190.00
Wednesday & Thursday only + Welcome Reception £415.00 £445.00 £255.00
Thursday & Friday only £370.00 £390.00 £170.00

* Buy one get one free offer applies to undergraduate students registering at the same time.  The offer is available only when registering to attend the whole conference, and can not be applied when attending part of the conference.  It does not include the welcome reception or annual dinner.  If you would like to register for the buy one get one free for undergraduate students, register at the same time to be invoiced collectively.

The full ASM registration fee includes: 3 day conference, lunches, refreshments and access to the Welcome Reception. It does not include the cost of accommodation or the Annual Dinner.

The annual dinner is an additional cost of £59.00 per person including 3 courses and half a bottle of wine per person.

Late Registration Fees

Registrations made after Friday 13th June 2014 will be charged an additional £50.00.

Cancellation

The final date for cancellations is 13th June 2014 and no refunds will be available after that date.  In the event of cancellation before 13th June 2014 registration feed will be refunded less a cancellation fee of £60.00.  Please note, those who have registered and cancel after 13th June 2014 will still be charged the full registration fee. 

Programme

Pre-Conference Workshops

Pre-Conference Workshops

Come to Brighton a day early to partake in one of our pre-conference workshops:

Conducting Medical Education Research (CMER) 

Medical education research can be a challenge for those new to the area who have a steep learning curve to climb.  ASME is running this workshop to foster the development of skills in medical education research and support those embarking on projects.

COST: (Including lunch and refreshments)

  • Non ASME Members £120
  • ASME Member £95
  • Student/Trainees £90

Time: 12-6pm

For the conference flyer click here.

To register to attend CMER please click here

Fundamentals of Leadership and Management in Education (FLAME)

The workshop comprises a combination of interactive group activities, short presentations, and individual exercises aimed towards gaining insight into the impact of leadership styles and approaches on the way that educational organisations are structured and function. The workshop covers some of the core topics in educational leadership and management including challenges and opportunities, policy    impact, change, leading people and teams, leading in complex environments and setting personal goals. This workshop will prepare you to undertake ASME's (or affiliated organisation's) comprehensive educational leadership courses.

Costs and registration to follow.

Wednesday 16th July

Programme for Wednesday 16th July

0830 - 1230

CALM Workshop

CALM - Change, Adaptive Leadership and Management Workshop
A follow up to FLAME or as standalone Workshop as part of the ASME FLAME (Fundamentals of Leadership and Management in Education) series.  Cost: £70.00

 

0845 - 0930

Registration

Arrival Refreshments
Setting up of posters and exhibits

 

Foyer
Auditorium 1

0930 - 1130

Workshops

  1. The art of dictation: how do we execute this in practice?
  2. Authoring and Implementing Interactive PBL Scenarios
  3. Professionalism: Teaching self-awareness, Building a toolkit to promote self awareness
  4. Getting started with Team Based Learning (TBL)
  5. Using Twitter in Medical Education: A live dissection
  6. How to be an effective role model: making explicit the implicit
  7. Using social networking as a reflective tool to support face to face teaching among medical students
  8. Supporting medical students mental health problems: what works?
  9. NIHR Funding for Medical Education icon erg
  10. TASME: Practical Teaching in the Clinical Environment
  11. Presenting skills for new presenters - A personal development opportunity for the novice presenter
  12. JASME: Pathways in Medical Education

To be confirmed

0930 - 1000

icon jasmeJASME Orientation – a guide on how to get the most out of the ASM for Junior/Student Doctors

 

10.00 – 12.00

icon edgEducator Development Group Session 
 ‘Speed dating’ session

 

1130 - 1200

Refreshment break & viewing of exhibits & posters

Auditorium 1

1200 - 1205

Welcome: Miss Nicky Pender, CEO & Professor Jennifer Cleland, Chair of ASME Council

 

1210 - 1240

The Lord Cohen Lecture

Clarence Braddock III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Vice Dean for Education, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, UA

Question & Answer session
Session Chair: Dr John Jenkins, CBE, ASME President

Auditorium 2

1250 - 1350

Lunch & viewing of exhibits & posters

Auditiorium 1

1355 - 1420

icon ergNew Researcher Award 2014

Julie Smith

Question & Answer session
Session Chair: Dr Jane Stewart, Chair, Education Research Group

 

1430 – 1525

Parallel sessions

See parallel session timetable

1530 - 1550

Refreshment break & viewing of exhibits & posters

Auditorium 1

1555 - 1715

Parallel sessions

See parallel session timetable

1730 - 1800

ASME Council Meeting

 

1930 - 2130

icon wileyWelcome Reception
Refreshments and canapés

Supported by Wiley-Blackwell
Welcome by Mr Martin Davies on behalf of Wiley

The Brighton Museum

Continuous Refreshments served in Auditorium 1 throughout the day

Thursday 17th July

Programme for Thursday 17th July

0800 - 0830

Registration & arrival refreshments

Auditorium 1

0830 - 0835

Welcome: Miss Nicky Pender , CEO & Professor Jennifer Cleland, Chair of ASME Council

Auditorium 2

0835 - 0905

Presentation of The ASME Gold Medal 2014

Brian Hodges MD,  Vice-President Education, University Health Network Richard and Elizabeth Currie Chair in Health Professions Education Research Scientist, Wilson Centre for Research in Education Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Senior Fellow, Massey College,  University of Toronto 

Question and Answer session
Session Chair: Professor Jen Cleland, Chair of ASME Council

Auditorium 2

0910 - 1030

icon ergParallel sessions including the Education Research Group Leading Research Session & the Technology Enhanced Learning SIG themed session

See parallel sessions timetable

1035 – 1050

ASME/GMC Announcement, Professor John Jenkins, ASME President and Professor Niall Dickson, CEO, GMC

Auditorium 2

1055 - 1110

Refreshment break & viewing of exhibits & posters

Auditorium 1

1115 - 1240

Parallel sessions

See parallel sessions timetable

1240 - 1330

Lunch & viewing of exhibits & posters

Auditorium 1

1330 - 1530

icon ergEducator Development Group (EDG)                            
What’s Hot in Learning and Teaching Innovations in Medical Education?

Session Chair: Professor Gill Doody, EDG Lead 

 

1330 – 1530

icon erg

Education Research Group
Support for Budding Researchers

Are you thinking about or working on an educational research project and looking for some advice or inspiration? Drop in and see if we can help.

Session Chair: Dr Jane Stewart, ERG Lead

 

1330 – 1530

icon psychometricsPsychometrics/Assessment SIG meeting    

 

1330 – 1530

icon telTechnology Enhanced Learning SIG meeting

 

1330 - 1530

Workshops

  1. What can you find on Facebook?
  2. Research misconduct amongst medical undergraduate students: unintended but important
  3. Medical educators as curriculum innovators: using a CoP approach to build community engagement
  4. Promoting integration and transfer of concepts in learning: practical approaches for problem based and other learning activities
  5. Can drama close the gap between patient narrative and student clerking?
  6. JASME: Introduction to research methods
  7. How can Multi-Source Feedback (MSF) assessment work in an undergraduate context?
  8. TASME: Running a committee-strategy solutions and survival
  9. What are the challenges of peer-to-peer teaching?
  10. TASME: Clinical Teaching Fellowships: strengths, opportunities and pathways 

To be confirmed

1330 - 1530

AoME@ASME event
Career Development for Educators through the AoME Professional Standards

 

1530 - 1555

Refreshment break & viewing of exhibits and posters

Auditorium 1

1600 - 1730

Chaired Poster Session

 

1600 - 1730

icon ergExtended ERG meeting – open to all interested in education research

 

1600 - 1730

icon tasmeTASME meeting – Trainees at ASME        

 

1745 - 1815

ASME AGM – open to ASME members & others who wish to attend

 

2000 - 2300

Annual Dinner
Pre-dinner drinks at 19.30

Presentation of the President’s Medal, Dr John Jenkins CBE

The Grand
Brighton Seafront

Continuous Refreshments served in Auditorium 1 throughout the day

Friday 18th July

Programme for Friday 18th July

0830

Registration & arrival refreshments

Auditorium 1

0845

Introductions, Dr John Jenkins, CBE, ASME President 

Auditorium 2

0855 – 0920

Sir John Ellis Student Prize Winner Presentation
Still to be decided

Question & Answer session
Session Chair: Dr Vincent Cooper, JASME Liaison Lead

 

0930 – 1130

Workshops

  1. JASME: Teaching and Simulation Toolkit
  2. Understanding the narrative-What matters to you?
  3. 2020 Visio: What can tomorrow’s foundation doctors learn from today’s undergraduate GP placements?
  4. Feedback technologies for advanced communication skills training
  5. Synergism in practice: Developing effective interprofessional education frameworks
  6. Hack Day: Developing technology-enhanced learning involves time at the intersection
  7. TASME: Mindfulness Training for Healthcare Professionals – feedback from a pilot project: sowing the seed
  8. The conversation with the person in my bed 3 ‘My bed’
  9. Tips on how to run an effective final year assistantship

 

0930 - 1130

icon edgEducator Development Group Session
‘Speed dating’

 

0930 – 1130

Writing for publication Journal Clinic (by appointment, places limited)

 

1130 – 1230

Parallel sessions

 

1235 - 1245

icon edgAnnouncement of Educator Development Group Travelling Fellowship Award Winners & Announcement of poster prize winner(s)

Session Chair: Educator Development Group Lead

 

1245 – 1300

Announcement of winners of the Journal Travelling Fellowships 2014, Silver Quill award 2014, IMPACT award 2014, The Henry Walton award & The Critics Choice award

Session Chairs: Kevin Eva, Editor, Medical Education, Jill Thistlethwaite & Michael Ross, Co-Editors, The Clinical Teacher

 

1305 - 1335

Closing Plenary
Lessons from Higher Education

Professor Madeleine Abrandt Dahlgren, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Department of Medicine and Health, Linköping University, Sweden

Question & Answer session
Session Chair: Professor Jennifer Cleland, Chair of ASME Council

Auditorium 2

1340

Close of conference

 

1340

Lunch (to take away)

Auditorium 1

1345

icon tasmeTASME meeting & elections for new TASME Committee 2014-15

 

1430 – 1600

Journal Board of Management and Strategy Meeting

Closed meeting

 

Continuous Refreshments served in Auditorium 1 throughout the day

Parallel Sessions

Parallel Sessions, including Special Interest Groups (SIGs) 

Parallel Session Timetable will follow in due course.

SIG Parallel Sessions Thursday 09.10am-10.30am  

Education Research Group Leading Research Session
The Education Research Group (ERG) seeks research papers that are theory-driven, methodologically robust and have the potential to add to the existing body of academic knowledge within medical education. The purpose of the session is to promote and discuss high quality research and selected papers are allocated 30 minutes in total for presentation, questions, comment and feedback.

Technology Enhanced Learning SIG themed session
The Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) Special Interest Group was formed in May 2012 to provide a forum for sharing best practice and fostering collaboration. It is aimed at medical educators who use TEL in their teaching, TEL specialists who develop and shape TEL practice within their organisations or at a national level and researchers of TEL.

Speakers

Clarence H. Braddock III, MD, MPH, FACP

Professor of Medicine, Vice Dean for Education, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA

Clarence H Braddock III

Dr. Braddock is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Stanford University, where he completed undergraduate work in Biology, and an AOA graduate of the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine.  He was trained in Internal Medicine at the U.S. Naval Hospital in Oakland, followed by service at the Naval Hospitals in Naples, Italy and in Oakland.  In 1989, Dr. Braddock joined the faculty at UC San Francisco and held multiple leadership positions at the VA Medical Center in San Francisco.  He moved to the University of Washington in 1993 to complete Masters training in Public Health and Certificate training in Health Care Ethics, then became Associate Chair of Medicine, overseeing undergraduate, graduate, and continuing medical education programs in the department. 

Dr. Braddock has been a national leader in medical education curriculum development and innovation, particularly in bioethics and doctor-patient communication. He launched the Bioethics Education Project at University of Washington, an initiative to expand ethics and professionalism education. Dr. Braddock went to Stanford in 2003 to launch the Practice of Medicine program at Stanford, an initiative to integrate ethics, professionalism, doctor-patient communication, and population health into the pre-clerkship medical school curriculum. He was Director of the National Consortium for Multicultural Education for Health Professionals, a group of eighteen medical schools funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to develop curriculum in cultural competence and healthcare disparities. He served as Co-PI on a curriculum intervention initiative in social and behavioral science being conducted jointly between Stanford and UCSF. In November 2013, Dr. Braddock was named Vice Dean for Education in the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, after an extensive national search. In this newly created position, Dr. Braddock oversees all aspects of medical education, including undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate medical programs.

Over his 25 years in medical education, Dr. Braddock has received extramural research funding for innovative curriculum development and for education-related research and scholarship from the NIH, nonprofit foundations, and other organizations and has a strong track record of peer-reviewed publications from that work.  Dr. Braddock’s research interests are in physician-patient communication and informed decision-making, having developed an assessment scale of the quality of informed decision making in clinical practice and applying it in a wide variety of published studies. In addition, he has an active medical education research program in such areas as bioethics, doctor-patient communication, cultural competence, health disparities, quality improvement, and social-behavioral science. He just completed a major quality improvement initiative funded by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, studying in-situ simulation and its impact on patient outcomes and interdisciplinary teamwork at Stanford Hospital.

Dr. Braddock has held many significant leadership roles in professional organizations, including the Society of General Internal Medicine, Association of American Medical Colleges, American Society for Bioethics and Humanities, American College of Physicians, and the American Board of Internal Medicine, for which he serves as Chair-elect.  He also has served on many national advisory boards, provides editorial services to a number of prestigious journals, and has received numerous teaching awards and other honors.  These include the Navy Commendation Medal, the Mentorship Award of the Society of General Internal Medicine, the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation Award for Excellence in Clinical Teaching at Stanford, and Outstanding Clinician-Educator from the Society of General Internal Medicine.

Dr. Braddock is presenting the Lord Cohen Lecture on Wednesday 16th July at 12.10pm in Auditorium 2.

Madeleine Abrandt Dahlgren

Professor in Medical Education

Madeleine Abrandt DahlgrenMadeleine Abrandt Dahlgren is Professor in Medical Education at the Faculty of Health Sciences in Linköping (since January 2012). She has published widely within the field of higher education particularly regarding the relationship between professional/higher education and professional work on the basis of the findings within an extensive international research program covering three generations, conducted in the period 2001-2008. The project was financially supported by a grant from the Fifth Framework of the European Commission of the European Union and was entitled ‘Students as Journeymen between cultures of Higher Education and Work’.

She is currently working on a four year national research project on interprofessional learning and simulation-based medical education. The project is a collaboration  with Gothenburg University Learning and Media Technology Studio and the Center for Advanced Medical Simulation and Training, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm and is financed by the Swedish Research Council.

Madeleine’s research group within Medical Education focuses on pedagogical processes within the socio-material practices of health care and medical education, such as interprofessional learning, simulation-based medical education and patient learning. She is also developing research on these issues in international collaboration with the network on Professional Practice, Education and Learning (ProPel) co-ordinated via Stirling University, UK, and the Work-Life-Learning-Change program at UTS, Sydney, Australia.

Professor Dahlgren is presenting the closing plenary on Friday 18th July at 13.05pm in Auditorium 2.

Registration

Your Details
Registration Options

Do not register without including your purchase order number if your institution requires one for invoicing. Invoices will be sent by email, please provide an email address where the invoice should be sent and who it should be addressed to (including institution/department name if applicable.

Details for Additional Registrant

Please note that these details only apply if you have selected the Undegraduate Student (Buy One Get One Free) offer in the Registration Type list above.

Invoicing Options

If different from above

If your registration is to be paid by your institution it is probable that a Purchase Order number will be required. Please do not register until you have the purchase order number. This will speed up the processing of your registration and reduce workload.

Information for Presenters

Information For Presenters

If you are presenting a workshop or a parallel session you need to bring your presentation on a USB stick. On the morning that you are presenting please go to the speakers preview room, where you will be met by an AV technician who will upload your presentation and network it to the relevant laptop and room. This means that when it is your time to present, your presentation will be ready for you on the laptop's desktop. 

In order to make this a smooth process - please name your presentation in the following format: 
Day/Room/Time/Surname

If you are presenting in a parallel session during our ASM

Please bring your presentation with you on the day you are presenting on a USB stick & name your presentation as follows:
Day/Room/Time/Surname

On the morning of your presentation please go to the speakers preview room (office 2) where you will be met by AV technicans who will upload your presentation from your USB and network it to the relevant room.

There will be a laptop, (with Powerpoint & DVD player), audio speakers, data projector & screen and a flip chart in all rooms. Each presentation is 10 minutes + 8 minutes for questions & 2 minutes for changeover . Please refer to the parallel session timetable for days, rooms & times of presentations.  All presenters must register & pay to attend the conference

If you are presenting a poster during our ASM

Posters must be portrait and a maximum size of 2m x 1m and they must be fixed to the poster boards using Velcro pads (these will be provided). Posters are to be shown for the whole conference and must be put up and taken down by the presenter.

The chaired poster session will be held on Thursday 17th July 16.00-17.30 when presenters are asked to stand by their poster to give a short verbal presentation and answer any questions.

If you can only attend one day of the conference, try to make it Thursday for this session. The posters will also be judged on this day for the main poster competition and the student poster competition.

All presenters must register & pay to attend the conference.  If your poster is not displayed it can not be judged.

If you are presenting a workshop during our ASM

Bring your workshop presentation on a USB stick and name it as follows:
Day/Room/Time/Surname 

On the morning of your workshop please go to the speakers preview room (office 2) where you will be met by AV technicans who will upload your presentation from your USB and network it to the relevant room. 

Bring your own handouts for your workshop group. There will be a laptop, (with Powerpoint & DVD player), audio speakers, data projector & screen and a flip chart in all rooms. If you need anything additional to this please bring it yourself.  Please DO NOT unplug the laptops provided in the room as they are networked for other sessions

Room allocation and layout will be based on your initial requirements + the number of delegates attending your workshop.  All workshop presenters must register & pay to attend the conference.  It is the workshop leaders responsibility to organize any feedback they receive.

Workshops

You will be able to sign up for workshops on each day of the conference, there will be no opportunity to register for a specific workshop before you attend the conference *Apart from CALM.

You will be asked to select which workshops you would like to attend when you register each morning.  

Wednesday

Workshops for Wednesday 16th July 8.30am – 12.30pm

CALM - Change, Adaptive Leadership and Management Workshop

Wednesday 08.30am-12.30pm

A follow up to FLAME or as standalone Workshop as part of the ASME FLAME (Fundamentals of Leadership and Management in Education) series

Faculty: Judy McKimm & Paul Jones

Cost: GBP £70 (fee covers the half-day workshop including all materials)

This half day workshop provides an introduction to the key concepts of change and adaptive leadership for healthcare educators who wish to develop a deeper understanding of leadership and management theory, how to manage change and gain an evidence base to help them become more effective leaders in a complex world.

The workshop comprises interactive group activities, short presentations and individual exercises aimed towards gaining insight into how change can be planned for, managed and led from personal, interpersonal and organisational perspectives. Core topics include the leader as an agent of change; psychological responses to change; models of change management; leading teams through change; change in complex organisations and contexts; setting personal goals and action planning. 

Workshops for Wednesday 16th July 9.30am – 11.30am

Workshop 1 - The art of dictation: how do we execute this in practice?

Selina Khan & David Little, Queen Elizabeth Hospital

Workshop Description
Dictation is used widely in the outpatient setting as a method for documenting a clinical consultation between the doctor and patient. Being able to effectively dictate letters is fundamental to the relationship between primary and secondary care through facilitating communication of events to the patient and general practitioner. Many specialty trainees have had limited practise at dictation and no formal training on the best approach instead learning from 'trial and error'.

This workshop aims to provide trainees with a structured basis for dictation, an environment to practise dictating and summarising key findings. Trainees will work on devising a structured format for dictation including important content whilst being clear and concise. A universal dictation protocol will be formed and implemented during this workshop with a further aim to disseminate this protocol nationally. 

Workshop Objectives
Participants attending this workshop should become more effective at dictation,in particular focusing on being concise, clear and structured in their approach. Individuals will achieve this by translating clinical cases into a formal dictation which would be assessed for clarity, content and conciseness.

Individuals will be encouraged to develop their own style and structure of dictation with the aim of carrying this forward into their clinical practice. A group approach towards developing a formal structure for dictation will allow for the creation of an effective format for optimal dictation practice. Group discussion will facilitate the formation of a universal protocol.

Participants of this workshop should aim to become more confident with the principles of dictation, summarisation and limit hesitation during dictating. Individuals will be critiqued on technique, approach and professionalism.

Workshop 2 - Authoring and Implementing Interactive PBL Scenarios

Prof T. Poulton  & Sheetal Kavia, St Georges University of London

Workshop Description
St George’s University first introduced Virtual Patients Cases within their problem-based learning (PBL) sessions in September 2009. Following the successful JISC funded Generation 4 project the interactive PBL has been a permanent implementation in the medical curriculum.

This workshop will present the lessons that can be learnt from embedding Virtual Patient PBL cases into the curriculum. Participants will have a hands-on session to learn how to create new or adapt existing PBL cases into interactive PBL cases, tailored to their own requirements.

Workshop Objectives
Participants attending this workshop will:

  • Consider the advantages and disadvantages of interactive VP based PBL
  • Learn how to create VP-based PBL cases
  • Receive an introduction to some of the different VP authoring systems (OpenLabyrinth, MedEdCases, Decision Simulation, UChoose)
  • Learn what to do, and what not to do, when creating VP PBL cases
  • Learn how to create ‘options and consequences’ in patient cases

Workshop 3 - Professionalism: Teaching self-awareness.. Building a toolkit to promote self-awareness

Dr Rachel Morris , Dr Sally Quilligan, Dr Francesca Crawley and Dr Rebecca Riddell, University of Cambridge and the University of Aberdeen

Workshop Description
Self- awareness is a core domain of the Medical Leadership Competency Framework (Spurgeon 2010), and Tomorrow’s Doctor’s 2009 (GMC 2009) states that the graduate should be able to recognise their own personal and professional limits and be able to build positive working relationships. Self-awareness is currently taught predominantly by indirect methods in medical courses (Passi et al, 2010) and while there have been several studies published about the personality profile of applicants to medical courses and medical specialities, there has been little work on the role of self-assessment tools and personality profile in the teaching of self-awareness to medical students(Benbassat J and Baumal 2005). This workshop is a follow up to last year’s workshop ‘Teaching self-awareness, is there an ideal tool?’ in which we developed several criteria to be used tools for self-awareness teaching in a medical student population (listed below).

An ideal tool for use with medical students should be:

  • Non-judgemental, safe and supportive and not an assessment
  • Clinically relevant and contextualised
  • Insightful and meaningful with authentic, useful output
  • Valid and reliable
  • Integrated with and facilitative of reflection
  • Cheap and easy to administer and analyse
  • Productive of clearly defined outcomes which can be linked with feedback to the student
  • Predictive of behaviours and transferrable to different situations
  • Evidence based with a robust theoretical basis
  • Inclusive of feedback from many different sources
  • Engaging and motivational

We compared these criteria to self-assessment, profiling and multi-source feedback tools available, some of which are currently used in undergraduate education and concluded that there was no one tool currently available which was ideal for medical students. There seems to be an opportunity for development and collaboration in this area; so, using participants experience of teaching self-awareness, and using the characteristics of an ‘ideal’ self awareness tool, this workshop will attempt to design a programme or ‘toolkit’ to enable students to start on their journey of fostering self-awareness.

Workshop Objectives:
This workshop will specifically look at how to teach the competencies related to self-awareness in the Management and Leadership Competency Framework (Spurgeon 2010):
Following the workshop participants should be able to:

  • Identify the learning needs of medical students in the area of self-awareness
  • Be familiar with the criteria for an ‘ideal’ self-awareness tool developed at ASME 2013
  • Contribute to the development of a new tool or ‘toolkit’ for fostering self-awareness
  • Contribute to the design of a curriculum addressing self-awareness
  • Collaborate with others in further research in this area

Workshop 4 - Getting started with Team Based Learning (TBL)

Kevin McConville & Shihab Khogali, University of Dundee Medical School

Workshop Description
Team based learning (1-4) is a form of small group collaborative and active learning delivered in a large classroom setting. TBL uses a specific sequence of student individual & group work and immediate feedback from a content-expert facilitator(s) to create a motivational framework in which students apply acquired knowledge to solve problems; while holding each other accountable for their individual preparation and for their contributions to group discussion.

Workshop Objectives
By the end of this workshop participants should be able to:

  • Explain the essential principles of team based learning (TBL)
  • Describe the sequence for the TBL approach
  • Evaluate the potential benefits of TBL to students, staff, and medical education institutions

Workshop 5 - Using Twitter in Medical Education : A live dissection

Annalisa Manca, Ellie Hothersall, Natalie Lafferty, University of Dundee School of Medicine

Workshop Description
The complex environment of medical education requires academic and clinical teaching staff to be proficient and up-to-date with their educational skills and expertise, applying established pedagogical theory and, at the same time, strive for innovation. Supported and inspired by the #FOAMed movement, medical educators are increasingly engaging with free open-access online tools to design innovative educational activities to engage students in active learning.
In this workshop we will argue that designing good educational activities is not always a “constructive” activity but sometimes we need to “deconstruct” what is already “out there” in order to make sense of it. We will deconstruct a successful Twitter-based online learning activity we run at Dundee Medical School to support Public Health teaching. We will use social learning theory concepts and Albert Bandura’s self-efficacy notion to analyse this case-study and discover how a sound educational design can enhance self-efficacy.

We will also discuss the important concept of cognitive load, which is increased exponentially in an online activity because not only students have to deal with the learning content, but also with “satellite” elements such as online professionalism, digital literacy, learning a new tool and new communication patterns - all contributing to the load.

Workshop Objectives

  • Become familiar with Bandura’s social learning theory
  • Understand self-efficacy and why it matters for learning, especially when using new technologies
  • Deconstruct learning activities to find what helps students’ learning and what doesn’t
  • Plan, design and run a successful online learning activity based on discussion
  • Recognise cognitive load, what contributes to it and how to deal with it
  • Facilitate reflection about social learning and group dynamics in an online-based medical education activity
  • Identify and reflect on the dialogical aspects of learning and knowledge construction

Workshop 6 - How to be an effective role model: making explicit the implicit

Kate Ippolito and Jo Horsburgh, Imperial College London

Workshop Description
Based on the latest evidence, this workshop offers practical strategies to maximise your impact as a role model for healthcare students and trainees.

Workshop Objectives
By the end of the workshop participants will be better able to:

  • Recognise how students and trainees learn from role models
  • Identify contradiction between the formal curriculum and what’s learnt from workplace role models
  • Analyse the impact of role models in own setting
  • Develop practical strategies for maximising the value of workplace role models for learners

Workshop 7 - Using social networking as a reflective tool to support face to face teaching among medical students

Jennifer Kennedy and Natalie Lafferty, University of Dundee

Workshop Description
Whilst there is an assumption that today’s students are digital natives and adept at using technology to support their learning, there is growing evidence that this is not necessarily the case. Students make good use of technology to support their personal and social lives but do not always appreciate the benefits technology and social media can bring to their learning.

Reflective learning is an essential attribute for lifelong learners and allows students the opportunity to make sense of their experience and change future behaviour. The usual approach for reflective learning is text based which has the potential to disengage some learners. Much has been written about the benefits of internet information and communication technology to support meaningful educational experiences. It is well documented that asynchronous, computer mediated teaching supports flexibility, reflection, interpersonal and teamwork skills development, motivation and collaborative learning.

In this interactive and hands on workshop we will consider how social networking can be used to support face to face teaching of medical students and in particular how it might be used as a reflective tool. We will share our experience of using social networking, a private Google+ Community, in this context and show participants how they can use a social networking community in their own teaching. The session will highlight how a social networking tool can introduce students to seeing the benefits of using technology to personalise and support their learning whilst also increasing their awareness of issues around digital professionalism.

Workshop Objectives:
At the end of this workshop, participants ould be able to:

  • Understand the pedagogy behind ICT in teaching and learning and reflection
  • Reflect critically on the use of social networking as a reflective tool in their own context
  • Demonstrate how to use a social networking community to promote reflection in healthcare students

Workshop 8 - Supporting medical students’ mental health problems: What works?

Duncan Shrewsbury, University of Birmingham / Exeter and Andy Grant, Swansea University

Workshop Description
With increased tuition fees and greater pressures in higher education and beyond, the support that an institution provides its learners will be scrutinised more finely. Supporting learners is key to ensuring a good and high quality learning experience. Learners will require, and come to expect, a more holistic package of support in preparing them to be safe and sound doctors of tomorrow. The general medical council have clearly set out the ways in which they expect medical schools to support their students’ mental health(1, 2) and are asking schools to state how they are meeting these requirements in their annual returns.

In this workshop we will revisit the evidence that mental illness is, indeed, particularly prevalent and problematic among medical students. We will then, in small group work, explore the evidence and examples of good practice to identify ways in which medical schools can help their students to enjoy good mental health, and cultivate good help seeking habits. We will use the GMC’s recommendations as a framework for reporting the group work.

We will ask each small group to look at one particularly area these will include: nurturing student peer support initiatives; using a case worker approach; monitoring student performance; personal tutoring and mentoring; minimising the burden of assessment; working with other agencies (e..g. Occupational health, University generic services, the NHS).

Workshop Objectives

Aims

  • To explore the issues relating to medical student mental health.
  • To familiarise participants with the literature, GMC recommendations and examples of good practice in relation to medical student mental health
  • To generate ideas for participants to facilitate learner-led initiatives locally
  • To produce recommendations in relation to support of medical students with mental health concerns.

By the end of the workshop, participants should develop:

Knowledge

  • Of the literature showing the prevalence of mental ill-health among medical students worldwide
  • Why medical students with mental health problems are reticent about accessing help
  • Successful interventions to improve medical student mental health and access to care

Skills

  • Development of support interventions that are acceptable to and approachable by medical students
  • Supporting peer-led interventions without undermining the essential by-students-for students quality

Attitudes

  • We will explore ways in which attitudes towards mental illness in the environment in which medical students live and work can be changed. This is a key goal if the experience of medical students with mental illness is to change significantly and permanently

Workshop 9 - NIHR Funding for Medical Education

The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)/ASME Education Research Group (ERG)

NIHR funding for Medical Education This workshop aims to introduce medical educationalists to the various funding opportunities offered by the National Institute for Health Research.  The team from NIHR will describe the awards available, how to apply including advice on putting an application together, as well as the support given to recipients. Deadlines for submissions will also be covered. The second part of the workshop will  be an open forum to discuss the personal interests of the audience.

Workshop 10 - TASME workshop: Practical Teaching in the Clinical Environment

Victoria Tippett

Workshop Description
Trainees often struggle to fit teaching into their busy working lives as they juggle service commitment and their own learning needs. Feedback from last year’s workshop at ASME ASM 2013 “Teaching in the clinical environment: from clinical chaos to educational excellence” suggested that participants would value more specific teaching tips and techniques. This workshop aims to suggest strategies for teaching in the Clinical Environment and encourage participants to explore with one another how these techniques could apply to their own working environment.

Workshop Objectives

  • to be able to identify the range of learners encountered in the clinical environment and discuss their educational needs
  • to understand the barriers to teaching in the clinical environment
  • to consider how a range of small group teaching strategies may apply to your working environment
  • to share teaching strategies with fellow workshop participants

Workshop 11 - Presenting skills for new presenters - a personal development opportunity for the novice presenter

Liz Spencer, Clinical Tutor, Gloucestershire and Simon Gay, Keele Medical School 

Workshop Description
Effective oral communication is a crucial skill for professionals. However, it is often overlooked and under-rehearsed in the scientifi c environment where presenters and their supervisors are concentrating on the content of the presentation rather than the method of delivery. Presenting to a large audience at a national conference is challenging particularly for fi rst time presenters who are anxious about their presentation skills and also about handling any questions posed by the “expert” audience. Very few people have outstanding presentation skills as a natural talent. However practice and receiving specific feedback can improve performance. This workshop is aimed at those presenting this year at the ASM in Brighton who would like the opportunity to rehearse their presentation ahead of time.

Workshop Objectives

  • Receive specific feedback and encouragement to enhance the “real” presentation.
  • Learn how your voice, physical presence and behaviour are received by the audience
  • Improve confidence with audience interaction

Thursday

Thursday 17th July 13.30am-15.30pm

Workshop 1 - What can you find on Facebook?

Michael Fox, Ben Savage, Milena Vannahme, Peter Fletcher, Bristol University at Gloucestershire Academy

Workshop Description
Five years and over one thousand ‘tagged’ photographs provide a comprehensive visual record of most of my undergraduate activities – good and bad. Like many I am alarmed by the increasing amount of information easily available about me online. August 2013, I decided to find out exactly how much information was publicly available about me on Facebook and was alarmed how much I found and it was the same for my colleagues. The message was clear: if a group of technology-savvy, privacy aware professionals sharing too much online, surely many other people are also at risk.

Advocates of social media highlight its role in facilitating communication, community and freedom of expression. However these same virtues also make information easily accessible to the public, employers, journalists and professional bodies. People are increasingly held to account for content they have published on social media sites and there are particular risks for medical students and doctors who are expected by both the GMC and society to adhere to a moral and professional code. In order to address the growing number of fitness to practise / disciplinary hearings relating to social media the GMC published guidance “Doctors use of social media” March 2013. It states that social media blurs the boundaries between public and private life and therefore doctors must be aware of the limitations of privacy online. The GMC also offers guidance on maintaining professional boundaries, respecting colleagues, maintaining confidentiality and anonymity online. Anecdotally, few doctors are aware of this specific guidance, which is alarming given the ubiquity of social media and that failure to follow this guidance may jeopardise GMC registration. Social media provides a window through which others view our personal lives and we must be alerted to the real, professional dangers of social media and equipped with the understanding and skills to make informed decisions about what to post online and how to optimise our privacy online.

This workshop will discuss the disparity between medical students’ perception of professional expectations and behaviours online, the common ways students put themselves and risk and areas of conflict with professional expectations. We will describe the framework we used to design an effect intervention raising awareness of professionalism online and furnish you with the knowledge and practical skills to develop an intervention of your own.

Workshop Objectives
Participants will be able:

  • To understand how students’ perceptions of professional expectations differ from expectations of professional bodies and regulators
  • To identify the dangers, risks and benefits of using social media in medicine
  • To recognise how people commonly put themselves at risk using social media
  • To recognise unprofessional behaviours online
  • To assess online privacy settings and understand their importance
  • To understand how to construct an effective intervention to improve professional behaviours online

Workshop 2 - Research misconduct amongst medical undergraduate students: unintended but important

Sarah Smithson, Robert McKinley, Keele University

Workshop Description
This workshop will focus on the potential problems arising when medical undergraduates engage in research activity out with the formal curriculum, unprepared and unaware of what constitutes responsible research conduct. Examples will be presented, together with relevant national and local policies. Participants will be encouraged to explore and analyse these, as well as sharing examples from their own institution. Consensus will be sought about key information for medical undergraduates about responsible research conduct, and draft guidance developed.

Workshop Objectives
At the end of this workshop, participants will:

  • Have a greater awareness of the ways in which medical undergraduates may, intentionally or not, commit research misconduct
  • Be able to draw general conclusions about research conduct from specific examples, which will be relevant to their own institution
  • Have developed a draft outline for guidance to medical undergraduate students about responsible research conduct.

Workshop 3 - Medical educators as curriculum innovators: using a CoP approach to build community engagement

Annalisa Manca, Natalie Lafferty, Alisdair Smithies, University of Dundee Medical School

Workshop Description
There is growing importance around the recognition and approval of trainers in medical education. Teachers are expected to be proficient and up-to-date with medical education, to apply pedagogical theory, follow established curriculum requirements and to develop innovative and engaging learning activities.

By applying the principles of Communities of Practice (CoP), this workshop will explore the opportunities for engagement with curriculum development activities and identify the benefits of applying principles from CoP in medical education.

This workshop will give an overview of the basic principles of this theory and examine how medical educators can use a CoP approach to address the requirements of the medical curriculum in their academic practice.

Workshop Objectives
The workshop will provide an overview of CoP theory and demonstrate how:

  • CoP can be integrated into practice
  • applied in personal practice to inform management of group dynamics in collaborative curriculum delivery
  • facilitate reflection on social learning/group dynamics in the workplace
  • identify and reflect on the dialogical aspects of learning and knowledge construction

Workshop 4 - Promoting integration and transfer of concepts in learning: practical approaches for problem based and other learning activities

Hilary Neve, Kerry Gilbert, Stephanie Bull, Plymouth University Peninsula School of Medicine and Unversity of Exeter Medical School

Workshop Description
This workshop uses Problem Based Learning (PBL) as a focus for considering the application of educational principles and evidence in practice and to explore ways that learning activities can better reflect the multifaceted roles of doctors. While the workshop will be of particular interest to delegates involved in PBL, it is designed to be relevant to anyone involved in designing or delivering medical education.

In 2010, the Peninsula Medical School began a major review of its PBL programme to identify ways that our programme could stay abreast of changes in healthcare practice and the growing educational evidence base. We identified a set of underpinning educational principles, a set of tools to address these (including an updated 8 step PBL process) and have piloted and evaluated changes in a series of PBL pilot cases.

This workshop aims to ask important questions about learning and facilitation and to provide participants with interactive opportunities to consider the relevance of our own and others’ research to their own setting and to share their own experiences and successes with the group.

By the end of the workshop participants will have:

  • Considered the theoretical and evidence base for PBL in medical education
  • Considered in particular, the principles of activating prior learning, concept based thinking, transfer and integration of learning
  • Shared relevant experiences from their own setting
  • Identified practical tools and approaches for addressing these principles and considered how to apply these in their own setting
  • Explored ways of using these tools to engage students in thinking about broader doctor roles, including population health and patient safety

Workshop Objectives:
By the end of the workshop participants will have:

  • Considered the theoretical and evidence base for PBL in medical education
  • Considered, in particular, the principles of activating prior learning, concept based thinking, transfer and integration of learning
  • Shared relevant experiences from their own setting
  • Identified practical tools and approaches to address these principles and considered how to apply these in their own setting
  • Explored ways of using these tools to engage students in thinking about broader doctor roles, including population health and patient safety

Workshop 5 - Can drama close the gap between patient narrative and student clerking?

Giovanna Sheiybani, Peter Fletcher, Bristol University at Gloucestershire Academy

Workshop Description
There are many different ways to learn medicine and the underlying concepts in the clinical setting. The use of simulation and role-playing is widely used as a means to teach communication skills. What has not been explored is the use of drama and patient narrative to understand how patients perceive their own illness and how it can impact on their behaviour in a consultation, e. g. dealing with an aggressive patient. Patient narratives, specifically, can be utilised to help students develop empathy and compassion for patients. This is particularly important in the light of the Francis report which states “The patients must be the first priority in all of what the NHS does. Within available resources, they must receive effective services from caring, compassionate and committed staff, working within a common culture, and they must be protected from avoidable harm and any deprivation of their basic rights”4. It is well-known that complaints are about doctors not listening to the patient and not allowing them to be involved in decision-making, which was the emphasis of the Francis report.

This workshop aims to show you how to use aspects of a patient’s history to write a monologue and how this can be used to create characters and formulate a script. We will use a script and narrative that will be performed. There will be an opportunity for delegates to act as ‘editors’ when interruptions are introduced, e.g. a relative of the patient. We hope this workshop will give you the tools required to try this technique for yourselves.

Workshop Objectives
By the end of this workshop, delegates will be able to:

  • List ways in which a medical student can ‘miss the point’ of a consultation
  • List techniques to write a patient narrative from a patient history
  • Use the patient narrative to create characters and form a basic script
  • Learn how staging and performing the scene can help in developing empathy
  • Understand how introducing people into the play may cause change to the script and apply these principles to real-life consultations

Workshop 6 - Introduction to research methods

Emily-Joy Dilley, Vince cooper, JASME

Workshop Description
Starting out as a researcher can be a daunting task. This workshop will discuss different approaches to setting up a “project” within medical education. Practical advice will be given on various issues ranging from how to develop a research question to methodology and analysing data. The workshop will be interactive and there will be many opportunities for discussion and questions

Workshop Objectives
Starting out as a researcher can be a daunting task. This workshop will discuss different approaches to setting up a “project” within medical education and provide practical advice on various issues from forming your research question to targeting research for publication. The workshop will be interactive and there will be many opportunities for discussion and questions. Following the workshop’s success in previously, this year, the focus will be on how to develop your research question, one of the most important foundations to any research project.

Workshop 7 - How can Multi-Source Feedback (MSF) assessment work in an undergraduate context?

Ashley Hawarden, Andrew Hassell, Keele University School of Medicine

Workshop Description
The development and assessment of professionalism is increasingly recognised as a key component of undergraduate medical (and other healthcare) programmes. In the postgraduate medical context, Multi-Source Feedback (MSF) has an established role in the assessment (both formative and summative) of professionalism of trainees. There has been interest in MSF in an undergraduate context, but there has been considerably less experience in this setting.

This workshop intends to share participants’ knowledge and experiences of MSF assessment programmes. We will describe the development of and evidence regarding, MSF as an assessment of professionalism and interpersonal skills in both postgraduate and undergraduate settings. We will encourage participants to share their experiences, and to explore the potential for MSF in undergraduate education. Discussions will include exploration of topics such as purpose, domains for assessment, scales for assessment, assessor selection, types of assessors and practical processes.

We will seek to explore delegates’ experiences of MSF, and develop potential solutions for any challenges or concerns encountered in this area of medical education. Additionally, we aim to develop some tips for successful implementation of MSF in undergraduate programmes based on the current literature and participants’ experiences of the MSF process.

Workshop Objectives
During this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Explore the potential of MSF in an undergraduate setting
  • Discuss their personal experiences of MSF
  • Share and analyse the potential advantages and disadvantages of MSF
  • Share and analyse best practice for MSF assessment
  • Learn how to recognise and manage the challenges of large MSF programmes
  • Develop skills to enable their organisation to instil an acceptable culture of MSF assessment
  • Develop skills that will assist in implementing a programme of MSF assessment within their own institution

Workshop 8 - TASME workshop - Running a committee – strategy, solutions and survival

Peter Johnston, Isabelle Hancock, Shamim Nassrally, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary

Workshop Description
Do you have to organise a group or a committee, chair meetings and run agendas? If you do, does it feel like herding cats? This is a hands-on workshop, designed to raise awareness of committee structures and committee working, agenda setting, delegation and responsibility. The distinction between delivering information and facilitating a pertinent discussion will be explained. Providing tips on the value of summary, action point construction and minuting to provide clarity and evidence of decision making. The interplay of technical and non-technical skills will be demonstrated. Participants will have the opportunity to form a committee, set an agenda and discuss some items with the opportunity for critique and reflection.

Workshop Objectives
Objectives for participants include:

  • Knowledge of how committees work and what their functions can be
  • Describe the ideal characteristics of different roles within a committee
  • Understanding how to achieve output from committees and groups, being aware of the ongoing work that underlies committee meetings
  • Developing skills in organising and taking a part in committee work, setting agendas, delegating and accepting delegated roles and tasks, taking minutes
  • Developing awareness of the behaviours in committee members and office bearers that contribute beneficially to committee business
  • Create an action plan on how to tackle challenges that can commonly arise within a committee

Workshop 9 - What are the challenges of peer-to-peer teaching?

Eliot Rees, David Blanchard, Keele University

Workshop Description
This workshop intends to share knowledge and experiences of peer-to-peer teaching and thereby facilitate participants to develop appropriate skills and attitudes for successful implementation of peer-to-peer teaching in undergraduate medical curricula. We will describe the development and expansion of a peer-to-peer teaching programme within our institution before seeking to explore delegates’ experiences in this field, and to develop potential solutions for the challenges encountered in this area of medical education.

Workshop Objectives
During this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss their personal experiences of peer to peer teaching
  • Share and analyse the potential advantages and disadvantages of peer-to-peer teaching for educational processes within their own organisation
  • Learn how to recognise and manage the challenges of peer-to-peer teaching within the undergraduate medical curriculum
  • Develop skills to enable their organisation to instil an acceptable culture of peer-to-peer teaching

Workshop 10 - TASME Clinical Teaching Fellowships: strengths, opportunities and pathways

Rakesh Patel , Cliff Shelton , David Little , Duncan Shrewsbury, TASME

Workshop Description
One of the subjects that TASME most frequently gets asked about is Clinical Teaching Fellowships. Trainees remain uncertain as to what they are, what their purpose and value is, and what they should consider when applying for one. Clinical Teaching Fellowships are increasing in number in the UK , and are becoming a popular choice for trainees with an interest in medical education. There is great variation in what such fellowships can offer, and what is expected of fellows in-post. There are important factors to negotiate, such as balance of clinical and on-call commitments, training (e.g. postgraduate qualification in medical education), and support. When considering where, when and why to apply for such posts, trainees need to be aware of the skills they bring to the role, as well as the skills that can be developed by the role.

This workshop is aimed at those interested in applying for, or in the early stages of as Clinical Teaching Fellowship. The workshop will provide an engaging, practical opportunity for participants to explore what a Clinical Teaching fellowship is, what it can do for you, what to look for in one and how to apply for one. Further to this, the workshop will provide a structured means of developing action plans so that trainees can best take advantage of the opportunities on offer during a teaching fellowship, by exploring aspects of scholarship, research and professional development in medical education.

Workshop Objectives
The aim of the workshop is to help trainees explore whether a Clinical Teaching Fellowship is right for them, what opportunities they could provide and how to derive most benefit from these posts.

By the end of this session participants will:

  • have an awareness of the varied roles and expectations of teaching fellows
  • be aware of the opportunities available during a fellowship
  • appreciate the differences between, value of and roles of scholarship and research in medical education
  • be able to evaluate personal qualities, goals and ambitions to help develop aims for achievement during fellowship
  • to strategically develop an action plan to optimise chances of achieving aims and deriving maximal benefit from teaching fellow posts
  • to enthusiastically approach teaching roles as a valuable and exciting opportunity

Workshop 11 - The Academy of Medical Educators - Career Development for Educators through the AoME Professional Standards

Vimmi Passi, Derek Gallen, Julie Browne, Andy Grant, Jamie Read

Workshop Description
We welcome all healthcare professionals to this exciting Academy of Medical Educators Workshop . This workshop will begin with a welcome from the President of the Academy, Professor Derek Gallen. The first part of the workshop will introduce the AoME Professional Standards and illustrate the importance the Professional Standards in the professional development of medical educators. Through a series of group exercises, participants will have the opportunity to reflect on their own educational activities in relation to the domains of the AoME Professional Standards. The second part of the workshop will be led by the Academy’s Early Careers Working Group who will focus on methods for supporting junior educators in training and will involve interactive small group work. The final part will be a panel discussion and an opportunity for participants to meet the Academy Council Members. 

Friday

Workshops for Friday 18th July 2014 09.30am-11.30am

Workshop 1 - JASME Teaching and Simulation Toolkit

David Cox, Sophie Mullins, Vince Cooper, JASME

Workshop Description
Teaching is an important part of being a doctor, so it is important for medical students to have a chance to learn teaching skills. Simulation is a modality growing in prevalence in medical education and students may have limited opportunity to develop experience teaching using it. This informal, interactive session offers a very brief introduction to basic teaching theory, followed by small group sessions. Students in groups will design a short scenario to teach a basic skill or concept to the other members of the group using the simulator and receive feedback from their peers and experienced teachers who will facilitate the groups. The session uses a variety of transferable skills, making this interesting workshop an excellent opportunity to practice and receive extensive feedback on your teaching. All feedback is constructive and will help to improve your skills as well as confidence.

Intended audience
Medical and healthcare students and junior doctors (N.B. this is a practical workshop designed to give students feedback on their teaching skills and is therefore not suitable for faculty members or other senior staff with significant teaching experience)

Workshop Objectives
The objectives include:

  • Knowledge
    To develop ability to design concise and achievable learning objectives for a small group teaching session; to develop some familiarity with designing a simple, short simulation session.
  • Attitudes
    To give participants confidence in their skills as teachers and encourage them to try teaching approaches that they may not have used before.
  • Skills
    The group based workshop will give participants practice and allow them to develop their session planning skills in small, non-threatening group situations. It will also allow them to develop their skills in delivering effective feedback.

Workshop 2 - Understanding the narrative – What matters to you?

Susan Law, University of Dundee

Workshop Description
This workshop will start with us talking about our own experiences of being patients (we will not be discussing illnesses). We will then move on discuss a video and some cases; exploring the patient narrative and looking at issues of empathy and compassion. After a brief presentation on the findings of the Francis Report and others, we will reflect upon how we might address Francis’s recommendations in our teaching and our practice.

We will close by discussing how we might help our learners develop as person centred practitioners.

Workshop Objectives:

  • To reflect on our own experiences as patients
  • To consider the Francis Report and its implication for medical teachers
  • To discuss our organisational culture and any need to for change?
  • To develop strategies to help our learners develop as person centred practitioners

Workshop 3 - 2020 Vision: What can tomorrow’s Foundation Doctors learn from today’s undergraduate GP placements?

Laurence Atkinson, Richard Davies, Rachel Morris, University of Cambridge . General practice education Group

Workshop Description
This workshop will explore what General Practice based teaching of undergraduate's can offer our students as they become the doctors of the 2020's. Drawing on the Lord Cohen Lecture at ASME 2013 and using the Outcomes for Graduates from Tomorrows Doctors 2009 as a starting point, participants will work in small groups to blueprint these against learning opportunities for students in General Practice. Participants will share knowledge of General Practice teaching models in their institutions.

Participants will identify core knowledge, skills and behaviours relevant to practice in the future and consider how these can be learned in a GP setting.
The groups will then work to begin writing a curriculum for undergraduate teaching in General Practice including aims, objectives and how these could be assessed.

Workshop Objectives

  • Identify which of the Outcomes for Graduates in Tomorrows Doctors 2009 can be achieved in a General Practice setting and review the common elements of current GP curricula
  • Identify the core elements of a future curriculum for undergraduate learning in General Practice
  • Identify how different teaching models in General Practice might deliver high quality learning opportunities to fulfil the curriculum
  • Discus models of assessment

Workshop 4 - Feedback technologies for advanced communication skills training

Hannah Toogood, Guy Undrill, University of Bristol

Workshop Description
This workshop focuses on ways to refine the communication skills of experienced professionals. We will offer suggestions of ways to provide differentiated learning in a group setting, with individual trainees being able to set their own learning objectives and direct feedback to address these. We will also demonstrate a way to tackle the common challenge of lack of self-awareness in relation to communication skills. The format will include exercises and didactic teaching including showcasing of video-tagging software of the type almost universally used by elite sports teams to provide accurate, specific, near time feedback. Participants will be encouraged to experiment with the techniques in small groups, followed by facilitator-led debriefing. The facilitators will discuss their experiences in designing, delivering and evaluating an advanced communication course for Psychiatry trainees, and encourage pooling of ideas for future applications and improvements.

Workshop Objectives

  • Participants should gain a more in-depth understanding of the importance of and key characteristics of effective feedback, with reference to communication skills teaching
  • Participants will have the opportunity to consider challenges related to teaching communication skills; and build confidence in facilitating communication skills training and giving structured feedback through exercises
  • Participants will be able to view one possible video-tagging system and consider its application to their own workplace

Workshop 5 - Synergism in practice: Developing effective interprofessional education frameworks

Andrew Teodorczuk & Tien K Khoo, Newcastle University and Griffith University

Workshop description
The World Health Organization (WHO) recognise many health systems throughout the world are fragmented and required to manage a growing set of unmet health needs1. However, it is also known that that if individuals from different professions learn together, they and their agencies have the potential to work better together, improving care and the delivery of service2. It follows, therefore, that Interprofessional Education (IPE), which encompasses any form of educational training, teaching or learning in which two or more health and social care professions are learning interactively, might help overcome this systems fragmentation.

With this in mind, this workshop showcases Griffith University ’s Implementation Framework for Interprofessional Learning 2011-2014 (Gold Coast, Australia ) which revolves around an effective 3-phase approach to IPE. The interactive workshop will comprise large and small group activities to help attendees understand and develop their own approach to this important facet of medical education. 

Workshop objectives

  • Understand the importance and relevance of IPE in medical and health professions education
  • Compare and contrast IPE teaching and learning opportunities in traditional and more modern medical curriculums
  • Develop a basic approach to the implementation of IPE framework in health programmes

Workshop 6 - Hack Day: Developing technology-enhanced learning involves time at the intersection

Rakesh Patel, Natalie Lafferty, Jane Williams, Robert Jay, University of Leicester , University of Dundee and University of Bristol

Workshop Description
The future of medical education lies in a closer collaboration between medical teachers, psychologists, learning technologists and educationalists (Harden, 2010). The aim of the workshop is to introduce the concept of a ‘hack day’ for facilitating collaborative ‘like-minded’ teams to come together and experiment, improvise, create, play or generally ‘hack stuff together’. This kind of idea sharing or hacking has nothing to do with trying to access high-security computers, because hacking in this context is about solving problems, exploring and creating with new technologies or data in medical education.

Workshop objectives

By the end of the workshop, participants will have a greater knowledge about:

  • The concept of a ‘hack day’
  • The new technologies and software available for solving (data-driven) problems or opportunities in medical education
  • The key issues facing learners, educators and academic institutions surrounding free and open technologies

By the end of the workshop, participants will have discussed and reflected over:

  • Using new technologies for tacking problems or opportunities in priority areas for medical educators
  • a network with like minded medical teachers, healthcare professions educators, learning technologists and educationalists interested in using a ‘hack day’ concept for bringing about change

Workshop 7 - Mindfulness Training for Healthcare Professionals - feedback from a pilot project: sowing the seed...

Duncan Still, Duncan Shrewsbury, TASME

Workshop Description
This workshop is aimed at those interested in introducing Mindfulness Training to health professionals. Mindfulness is a tool/skill/approach being used internationally in many different spheres to promote well being and reduce stress levels and burn-out. Our time together will be spent  1) outlining a pilot project being run in Severn Deanery School of Primary Care for GP trainees (looking at how to set up such a project as well as the outcomes and lessons learned along the way),   2) taking part in some guided Mindfulness Exercises and  3) helping participants move towards having their own Mindfulness Course in their geographical or specialist area (by helping to plan one themselves and helping them find the people/resources necessary)

Workshop objectives

By the end of this session participants will:

  • have developed a greater understanding of what Mindfulness is and how it can be incorporated into training
  • have experienced some basic Mindful practices which can be used in daily life/work
  • have used these experiences to reflect on how this might impact on their work with particular attention to the affective domain (esp one's attitude and ability re 'self-care' and one's capacity for empathy)

Workshop 8 - The Conversation with the person in my bed 3 ‘My bed’

Bee Martin, Ellayne Fowler, Stephanie Jordan, University of Bristol and Weston Area Health Trust

Workshop Description
This workshop is aimed at medical teachers who would like to go beyond standard clinical approaches to history taking and examination in order to enable students to engage with patients from the patient's perspective. This workshop will explore narrative medicine through an interactive initiative that required medical students to choose a hospital bed that they regularly visited in order to talk to the patient in the bed.

Workshop Objectives

  • list some key features of a narrative approach to medicine
  • define the benefits of a narrative approach to medicine
  • evaluate how a narrative approach would enable students to better cope with patients who they don't normally see
  • identify strategies to embed narrative approaches in teaching

Workshop 9 - Tips on how to run an effective final year assistantship

Peter Watson, Jan Illing, Roy Spence, Queen's University Belfast, Durham University

Workshop Description
The workshop will explore in what ways new medical graduates may not feel adequately prepared for Foundation training and how the medical assistantship should be structured to address their concerns.

The workshop is aimed at medical undergraduate teachers who are involved in preparing students for practice, postgraduate teachers and supervisors of the Foundation programme. Current undergraduate students and trainees are welcome and can make a valuable contribution to the discussions.

The workshop will explore:

  • In what ways may students be better prepared for practice?
  • How should assistantship be organised?
  • Does assistantship work?

Workshop Objectives
Participants will gain a knowledge of ways in which new medical graduates may not be fully prepared for practice and how they might address these areas through assistantship. They will also learn how to monitor and assess the effectiveness of assistantship.

Exhibitors

Exhibitors

Exhibition Stands

We are pleased to be able to offer space to exhibitors as follows for the duration of the conference:

Option 1 Commercial Organisations

This package includes:

  • 3m x 2m floor area
  • 2 x chairs
  • 1 x table (6' x2'6")
  • Wifi access (not hardwire)
  • Advert in ASME programme (artwork to be with ASME by 31st May)
  • Attendance for 2 representatives at the conference including refreshments, lunches and Welcome Reception

Cost: £895.00

Option 2 No Profit Organisations

This package includes:

  • 3m x 2m floor area
  • 1 x chair
  • 1 x table (6' x2'6")
  • Wifi access (not hardwire)
  • Attendance for 1 representative at the conference including refreshments, lunches and Welcome Reception

Cost: £495.00

Power is available with either of the above options at an additional cost of £50.00

Wifi is available with all stands for intermittent use. Should your booth require dedicated, high speed, hardwire access this is available at an additional cost of £250.00.

Exhibition Times

Exhibition space opens for set up: Tuesday 15th July 3pm – 5pm
Exhibition open: Wednesday16th July 8.30am – 5.30pm

Thursday 17th July 8.00am – 5.30pm

Friday 18th July 8.00am – 2.30pm

 

Shipping of Exhibition Materials

Please note: Items may only be delivered on Monday 14th of July 2014, 9am – 4pm.

Please send items to:

The Brighton Centre
Russell Road Entrance
Brighton
BN1 2GR
Attn: Jenny Ogg/Kathryn Dolphin

Please mark each packages as follows:

Room: Auditorium 1
Exhibiting Company Name: .....................

Please also include the following details on each item in the shipment:

Name:
Organisation:
Phone:

Please mark your shipment with Item x of xx.

For collection of your items at the end of the conference please arrange for them to be collected from the address above on Friday 18th July from 2.30-4.30pm please label your boxes clearly stating the company name, contact phone number, and number of boxes to be picked up.

Additional Conference Equipment and Venue Services

If you require any additional facilities or have any other enquiries please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. prior to making your booking.

Welcome Reception; Wednesday 16th July

The Brighton Museum, Royal Pavilion, Brighton

Exhibitors are welcome to attend our welcome reception and attendance is included in the exhibition cost.

Set in the heart of the city's cultural quarter, Brighton Museum & Art Gallery is located in the Royal Pavilion gardens. Its rich collections and exciting exhibits are dynamically displayed in stimulating surroundings.

The Brighton Museum & Art Gallery has recently undergone a £10 million redevelopment, and now offers historic surroundings filled with beautiful paintings, furniture, glass and ceramics.

The Welcome Reception will be held within the Brighton Museum from 7-9pm where canapés and drinks will be served.

Annual Dinner Thursday 17th July

Exhibitors are welcome to attend our Annual Dinner. The cost for this is £59.00 per head.

Click here to register now

Accommodation & Travel

Accommodation & Travel

Getting to Brighton

  • 50 minutes by rail from central London
  • 30 minutes by rail from Gatwick International Airport
  • 90 minutes by rail or road from London Heathrow
  • Over 7,500 parking spaces in the centre of the City

For more information about the city please visit http://www.visitbrighton.com/ or you can download this map of central Brighton.

Air

London Gatwick Airport has scheduled routes to over 170 cities world-wide. It is located approximately 28 miles (45 kilometres) from Brighton and can be reached in half an hour by either road or rail (a railway station is located inside the airport terminal).

London Heathrow Airport has more international connections than any other airport in the world. It is 90 minutes drive from Brighton using the motorway, or just under two hours using the underground to London Victoria railway station, and then fast express train service to Brighton. Fast coach services also run from both airports to Brighton coach station; 5 minutes walk from the Brighton Centre.

Rail

Brighton is connected to all areas of Britain via the National Rail network, and is only 52 minutes direct from London Victoria . The Gatwick Express departs London Victoria to Gatwick every 15 minutes and the fastest connection onto Brighton takes just 28 minutes.

There are frequent rail services into Brighton and the railway station is centrally located; 10 minutes walk from the Brighton Centre.

Road

Major improvements to the M23/M25 link means that dual carriageways run continuously from the M25 London orbital motorway to within two miles of the heart of Brighton.

Foot

There is no need for costly and complicated shuttle bus operations in Brighton due to the ‘walkability’ of the compact city.

Sea

European delegates wishing to bring their cars can use one of the many car ferries to Britain . Brighton is Britain ’s closest conference venue to the Continent, being approximately 2 hours driving time from the ferry ports of Dover and Folkestone, and only 30 minutes from Newhaven.

Tunnel

European delegates now have the option of travelling on the Eurostar service to St Pancras International where there is a direct train service to Brighton. Cars can be brought over by using the Eurotunnel from Calais to Folkestone (channel crossing time only 35 minutes).

Public Transport

Buses and taxis are plentiful throughout the city, 24 hrs a day. Buses run from all over the city and neighbouring towns regularly to the city centre where the Brighton Centre is located.

For more information about the conference venue please visit the Brighton Centre website at http://conferences.brightoncentre.co.uk/brighton-centre/

Accommodation

Please visit Visit Brighton’s website for information on hotels in Brighton for all budgets.